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The Collateral Costs of Clearing

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Abstract

In this working paper, we study the three generic clearing arrangements in the presence of two-sided limited commitment: simple bilateral clearing, segregated collateral clearing through a third party, and - most sophisticated of all - central counterparty (CCP) clearing. Clearing secures the settlement of obligations from over-the-counter (OTC) forward contracts that smooth the income of risk-averse agents. Clearing requires collateral to guarantee settlement; this is costly, as it reduces income from investment. While welfare is greater under more sophisticated clearing arrangements, we find that these are also more demanding in terms of collateral.

Suggested Citation

  • Cyril Monnet & Thomas Nellen, 2014. "The Collateral Costs of Clearing," Working Papers 2014-04, Swiss National Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:snb:snbwpa:2014-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ed Nosal, 2011. "Clearing over-the-counter derivatives," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 137-145.
    2. Kahn, Charles M & McAndrews, James & Roberds, William, 2003. " Settlement Risk under Gross and Net Settlement," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(4), pages 591-608, August.
    3. Daniel Heller & Nicholas Vause, 2012. "Collateral requirements for mandatory central clearing of over-the-counter derivatives," BIS Working Papers 373, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Duffie, Darrell & Scheicher, Martin & Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2015. "Central clearing and collateral demand," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 237-256.
    5. Bruno Biais & Florian Heider & Marie Hoerova, 2016. "Risk-Sharing or Risk-Taking? Counterparty Risk, Incentives, and Margins," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(4), pages 1669-1698, August.
    6. James J. McAndrews & William Roberds, 1999. "Payment intermediation and the origins of banking," Staff Reports 85, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. Bruno Biais & Florian Heider & Marie Hoerova, 2012. "Clearing, Counterparty Risk, and Aggregate Risk," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 60(2), pages 193-222, July.
    8. David Mills & Francesca Carapella, 2012. "Information insensitive securities: the benefits of central counterparties," 2012 Meeting Papers 1032, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2007. "Transferability, finality, and debt settlement," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 955-978, May.
    10. Ed Nosal & Robert Steigerwald, 2010. "What is clearing and why is it important?," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Sep.
    11. Narayana R. Kocherlakota, 1996. "Implications of Efficient Risk Sharing without Commitment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(4), pages 595-609.
    12. Jürg Mägerle & Thomas Nellen, 2011. "Interoperability between central counterparties," Working Papers 2011-12, Swiss National Bank.
    13. Michael J. Fleming & Kenneth D. Garbade, 2002. "When the back office moved to the front burner: settlement fails in the treasury market after 9/11," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 35-57.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hajime Tomura, 2014. "Payment Instruments and Collateral in the Interbank Payment System," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 032, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    clearing; central counterparty; segregation; novation; mutualization;

    JEL classification:

    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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