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Risk-Sharing or Risk-Taking? Counterparty Risk, Incentives, and Margins

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  • BRUNO BIAIS
  • FLORIAN HEIDER
  • MARIE HOEROVA

Abstract

Derivatives activity, motivated by risk-sharing, can breed risk taking. Bad news about the risk of the asset underlying the derivative increases the expected liability of a protection seller and undermines her risk prevention incentives. This limits risk-sharing, and may create endogenous counterparty risk and contagion from news about the hedged risk to the balance sheet of protection sellers. Margin calls after bad news can improve protection sellers incentives and enhance the ability to share risk. Central clearing can provide insurance against counterparty risk but must be designed to preserve risk-prevention incentives.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Biais & Florian Heider & Marie Hoerova, 2016. "Risk-Sharing or Risk-Taking? Counterparty Risk, Incentives, and Margins," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(4), pages 1669-1698, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:71:y:2016:i:4:p:1669-1698
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrew Ellul & Vijay Yerramilli, 2010. "Stronger Risk Controls, Lower Risk: Evidence from U.S. Bank Holding Companies," NBER Chapters,in: Market Institutions and Financial Market Risk National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    5. Stephens, Eric & Thompson, James R., 2014. "CDS as insurance: Leaky lifeboats in stormy seas," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 279-299.
    6. James R. Thompson, 2010. "Counterparty Risk in Financial Contracts: Should the Insured Worry About the Insurer?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1195-1252.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Corradin, Stefano & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2017. "On collateral: implications for financial stability and monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2107, European Central Bank.
    2. Cenedese, Gino & Ranaldo, Angelo & Vasios, Michalis, 2018. "OTC premia," Bank of England working papers 751, Bank of England.
    3. repec:ecb:ecbrbu:2017:0041:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stephens, Eric & Thompson, James R., 2017. "Information asymmetry and risk transfer markets," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 88-99.
    5. Dimitri Vayanos & Jiang Wang, 2012. "Market Liquidity - Theory and Empirical Evidence," FMG Discussion Papers dp709, Financial Markets Group.
    6. Bellia, Mario & Panzica, Roberto & Pelizzon, Loriana & Peltonen, Tuomas A., 2017. "The demand for central clearing: to clear or not to clear, that is the question," ESRB Working Paper Series 62, European Systemic Risk Board.
    7. Francesca Carapella & Cyril Monnet, 2017. "Dealers' Insurance, Market Structure, And Liquidity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-119, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    8. Rosenthal, Dale W.R., 2009. "Market structure, counterparty risk, and systemic risk," MPRA Paper 36786, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Dec 2011.
    9. Bignon, Vincent & Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2016. "The Failure of a Clearinghouse: Empirical Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 11630, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Cyril Monnet & Thomas Nellen, 2014. "The Collateral Costs of Clearing," Working Papers 2014-04, Swiss National Bank.
    11. Gündüz, Yalin, 2018. "Mitigating counterparty risk," Discussion Papers 35/2018, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    12. Augustin, Patrick & Subrahmanyam, Marti G. & Tang, Dragon Yongjun & Wang, Sarah Qian, 2014. "Credit Default Swaps: A Survey," Foundations and Trends(R) in Finance, now publishers, vol. 9(1-2), pages 1-196, December.
    13. Kubitza, Christian & Pelizzon, Loriana & Getmansky, Mila, 2018. "The pitfalls of central clearing in the presence of systematic risk," ICIR Working Paper Series 31/18, Goethe University Frankfurt, International Center for Insurance Regulation (ICIR).
    14. Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2018. "Completing Markets with Contracts: Evidence from the First Central Clearing Counterparty," CEPR Discussion Papers 13230, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Frei, Christoph & Capponi, Agostino & Brunetti, Celso, 2017. "Managing Counterparty Risk in OTC Markets," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-083, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), revised 25 Oct 2018.
    16. Thorsten V. Koeppl, 2013. "The Limits Of Central Counterparty Clearing: Collusive Moral Hazard And Market Liquidity," Working Paper 1312, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    17. Massimiliano Affinito & Matteo Piazza, 2018. "Always look on the bright side? Central counterparties and interbank markets during the financial crisis," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1181, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    18. Biais, B. & Heider, F. & Hoerova, M., 2013. "Incentive compatible centralised clearing," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 17, pages 161-168, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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