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Teenage risky behavior and parental supervision: the unintended consequences of multiple shifts school systems

Author

Listed:
  • Martín Rossi

    () (Department of Economics, Universidad de San Andres)

  • Ana Reynoso

    () (Department of Economics, Yale University)

Abstract

We study the relationship between attending high school at night and the probability of engaging in risky behavior, such as having unsafe sex or consuming substances. To address potential endogeneity concerns we take advantage of a random assignment of high school students to daytime and night shifts in the city of Buenos Aires. Using an original survey on students attending their last year of high school, we nd that girls attending high school in the evening start having sex at an earlier age and present a higher probability of getting an abortion. We nd no signi cant di erences for substance use. Our experimental approach suggests that the link between high school shift and risky behavior is causal. Results hold when we use an alternative sample of alumni. Finally, we report evidence that the lack of parental supervision is the mechanism underlying our results.

Suggested Citation

  • Martín Rossi & Ana Reynoso, 2015. "Teenage risky behavior and parental supervision: the unintended consequences of multiple shifts school systems," Working Papers 121, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:sad:wpaper:121
    as

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    File URL: ftp://webacademicos.udesa.edu.ar/pub/econ/doc121.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    school; teenage; behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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