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The Impact of Families on Juvenile Substance Use

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  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes

    ()

  • Traci Mach

    ()

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of family composition on juvenile substance use and drug sales using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The results underscore the importance of having a father figure in the household in deterring juvenile smoking, marijuana use, and drug sale. However, the extent to which father figures affect juvenile substance use and drug sales varies according to their biological link to the youth and the youth's gender. Results further indicate that siblings and their involvement in substance use and drug sales significantly influence youths' own exposure to these delinquent practices. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Traci Mach, 2002. "The Impact of Families on Juvenile Substance Use," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 269-282, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:4:y:2002:i:3:p:269-282
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1021754313773
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ann Dryden Witte & Helen Tauchen, 1994. "Work and Crime: An Exploration Using Panel Data," NBER Working Papers 4794, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 1999. "Why Is There More Crime in Cities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 225-258, December.
    3. Witte, Ann D & Tauchen, Helen, 1994. "Work and Crime: An Exploration Using Panel Data," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 49(Supplemen), pages 155-167.
    4. Grogger, Jeff, 1998. "Market Wages and Youth Crime," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 756-791, October.
    5. Tetsuji Yamada & Michael Kendix & Tadashi Yamada, 1993. "The Impact of Alcohol Consumption and Marijuana Use on High School Graduation," NBER Working Papers 4497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martín Rossi & Ana Reynoso, 2015. "Teenage risky behavior and parental supervision: the unintended consequences of multiple shifts school systems," Working Papers 121, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2016.
    2. Carlos Casacuberta & Mariana Gerstenblüth & Patricia Triunfo, 2012. "Aportes del análisis económico al estudio de las drogas," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0112, Department of Economics - dECON.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    biological parents; siblings; substance abuse;

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