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Pensions and fertility: a simple proposal for reform

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  • TIM BUYSE

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Abstract

This paper evaluates the effects of a parametric adjustment to an earnings-related PAYG pension system. We show that a simple but ‘intelligent’ reform, in which the calculation of the pension base is changed, may result not only in more employment and growth, but also in an increase in fertility. Such an ‘intelligent’ pension design would maintain a strong link between own labor income and the future pension, while putting more (less) weight on the labor income earned as an older (young) worker in the calculation of the pension base. The higher (lower) marginal utility from work when older (young) following this reform makes it interesting to shift work from the first to later periods of active life. Part of the available time that arises during youth is spent on education. Another part can be spent on raising offspring. By contrast, a shift to a fully-funded system might even reduce fertility.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Buyse, 2014. "Pensions and fertility: a simple proposal for reform," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 14/888, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:14/888
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    demographic change; fertility; retirement; pension reform; overlapping generations;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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