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Implicit Attitudes Toward Green Consumer Behavior

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  • D. VANTOMME

    ()

  • M. GEUENS

    ()

  • J. DE HOUWER
  • P. DE PELSMACKER

    ()

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of implicit (automatic) attitudes to explain the weak attitude-behavior relationships often found in consumer behavior research. One research domain that has revealed low attitude-behavior consistencies is environmentally friendly consumer behavior. In order to better understand this discrepancy, we measured not only explicit but also implicit attitudes toward green consumer behavior by means of the Implicit Association Test (IAT). Explicit measures revealed positive attitudes, while the IAT showed more positive attitudes toward the ecological than toward the traditional product (Exp.1) or no differences in these attitudes (Exp.2 and 3). When existing products were involved, implicit attitudes related to behavioral intention, even where the explicit attitude measure did not.

Suggested Citation

  • D. Vantomme & M. Geuens & J. De Houwer & P. De Pelsmacker, 2004. "Implicit Attitudes Toward Green Consumer Behavior," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/224, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:04/224
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    1. Fournier, Susan, 1998. " Consumers and Their Brands: Developing Relationship Theory in Consumer Research," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 343-373, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. William Young & Kumju Hwang & Seonaidh McDonald & Caroline J. Oates, 2010. "Sustainable consumption: green consumer behaviour when purchasing products," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 20-31.
    2. Mattavelli, Simone & Perugini, Marco & Richetin, Juliette, 2015. "When the Brand Refers to Me, I Prefer Going Green," 143rd Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, March 25-27, 2015, Naples, Italy 202709, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Liobikienė, Genovaitė & Mandravickaitė, Justina & Bernatonienė, Jurga, 2016. "Theory of planned behavior approach to understand the green purchasing behavior in the EU: A cross-cultural study," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 38-46.
    4. Rui Gaspar, 2013. "Understanding the Reasons for Behavioral Failure: A Process View of Psychosocial Barriers and Constraints to Pro-Ecological Behavior," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(7), pages 1-16, July.
    5. Arcidiacono, Davide, 2011. "Consumer rationality in a multidisciplinary perspective," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 516-522.

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