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Economic, housing conditions and health of old people in Italy: evidence from EU-SILC

  • Elisabetta Santarelli


    (Department of Methods and Models for Economics, Territory and Finance MEMOTEF, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy))

  • Anna De Pascale


    (Department of Methods and Models for Economics, Territory and Finance MEMOTEF, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy))

Economic and demographic factors are key determinants of health status in old age. Although,in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the evaluation of the relationships between these factors and individual health status in Italy, limited attention has been devoted to the link between housing and health. In this paper, we explore the associations between economic and housing statuses and self-reported health among the elderly, i.e. people aged 65 or over. We analyze data from EU-SILC, the new Eurostat project on Community Statistics on Income and Living Conditions, wave 2006. Results confirm the positive socioeconomic status-health gradient usually found in literature and show that housing conditions have an important role in affecting the health status of the oldest in Italy. These findings increase the need of incorporating socioeconomic and housing factors into health policies in a long term perspective.

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Paper provided by Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF in its series Working Papers with number 99/12.

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Handle: RePEc:rsq:wpaper:10/12
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