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Social capital and its relationship with measures of health status: evidence from the Health Survey for England 2003

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  • Stavros Petrou
  • Emil Kupek

    (National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford (Old Road Campus), UK)

Abstract

Social capital is a concept that attempts to describe the quantity and quality of social interactions in a community. This study explores the relationship between individual measures of social capital and alternative measures of health status within the context of a large national survey of population health. Using data for 13 753 adult participants in the 2003 Health Survey for England, linear regression with weighted least-squares estimation and Tobit regression with upper censoring were used to model the relationship between individual measures of social capital and EQ-5D utility scores. In addition, logistic regression was used to model the relationship between individual measures of social capital and a dichotomous self-reported health status variable. The study demonstrated that low stocks of social capital across the domains of trust and reciprocity, perceived social support and civic participation are significantly associated with poor measures of health status. The implications for health economists and, potentially, for policymakers are discussed. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Stavros Petrou & Emil Kupek, 2008. "Social capital and its relationship with measures of health status: evidence from the Health Survey for England 2003," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 127-143.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:127-143
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1242
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2015. "Structural social capital and health in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 129-142.
    2. Damiano Fiorillo & Nunzia Nappo, 2017. "Formal volunteering and self-perceived health. Causal evidence from the UK-SILC," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 75(2), pages 112-138, April.
    3. Yamamura, Eiji, 2015. "Social capital and views on suicide via the internet: a study using survey data," MPRA Paper 64071, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Xindong Xue & W. Robert Reed, 2015. "The Relationship Between Social Capital And Health In China," Working Papers in Economics 15/05, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    5. Elisabetta Santarelli & Anna De Pascale, "undated". "Economic, housing conditions and health of old people in Italy: evidence from EU-SILC," Working Papers 99/12, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
    6. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Different effects of social capital on health status among residents: Evidence from modern Japan," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 475-479.
    7. Damiano, Fiorillo & Lubrano Lavadera, Giuseppe & Nappo, Nunzia, 2017. "Individual heterogeneity in the association between social participation and self-rated health. A panel study on BHPS," MPRA Paper 78933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2011. "Quality and quantity: The role of social interactions in self-reported individual health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(11), pages 1644-1652.
    9. Sabatini, Fabio, 2014. "The relationship between happiness and health: Evidence from Italy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 178-187.
    10. Birgit Leimer, 2017. "No “Honeymoon Phase” Whose health benefits from retirement and when," Working Papers 1718, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    11. Lorenzo Rocco & Elena Fumagalli & Marc Suhrcke, 2014. "From Social Capital To Health – And Back," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(5), pages 586-605, May.
    12. Nauenberg, Eric & Laporte, Audrey & Shen, Leilei, 2011. "Social capital, community size and utilization of health services: A lagged analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 38-46.
    13. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy Van Doorslaer & Tom Van Ourti, 2013. "Health and Inequality," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-170/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    14. Liu, Gordon G. & Xue, Xindong & Yu, Chenxi & Wang, Yafeng, 2016. "How does social capital matter to the health status of older adults? Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 177-189.
    15. Yamamura, Eiji, 2008. "The role of social capital in homogeneous society: Review of recent researches in Japan," MPRA Paper 11385, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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