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Elisabetta Santarelli

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First Name:Elisabetta
Middle Name:
Last Name:Santarelli
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RePEc Short-ID:psa1067
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Research output

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Working papers

  1. Giuseppina Guagnano & Elisabetta Santarelli & Isabella Santini, "undated". "Subjective poverty in Europe: the role of household socioeconomic characteristics and social capital," Working Papers 113/13, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
  2. Elisabetta Santarelli & Anna De Pascale, "undated". "Economic, housing conditions and health of old people in Italy: evidence from EU-SILC," Working Papers 99/12, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
  3. Elisabetta Santarelli, "undated". "A review of the literature on subjective poverty in Europe: a focus on data sources," Working Papers 118/13, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.

Articles

  1. Elisabetta Santarelli & Claudio Di Carlo, 2013. "La sanità elettronica in Italia: evidenze dall’indagine LITIS," RIVISTA DI ECONOMIA E STATISTICA DEL TERRITORIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(1), pages 34-61.
  2. Elisabetta Santarelli, 2011. "Economic resources and the first child in Italy: A focus on income and job stability," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(9), pages 311-336, July.
  3. Elisabetta Santarelli & Francesco Cottone, 2009. "Leaving home, family support and intergenerational ties in Italy: Some regional differences," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(1), pages 1-22, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Giuseppina Guagnano & Elisabetta Santarelli & Isabella Santini, "undated". "Subjective poverty in Europe: the role of household socioeconomic characteristics and social capital," Working Papers 113/13, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.

    Cited by:

    1. Silvia PALASCA, 2015. "Living Standards In Europe. A Regional View," EURINT, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 2, pages 297-307.
    2. Zsoka Koczan, 2016. "Being Poor, Feeling Poorer; Inequality, Poverty and Poverty Perceptions in the Western Balkans," IMF Working Papers 16/31, International Monetary Fund.

Articles

  1. Elisabetta Santarelli, 2011. "Economic resources and the first child in Italy: A focus on income and job stability," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(9), pages 311-336, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Tom Kornstad & Marit Rønsen, 2014. "Women's wages and fertility revisited. Evidence from Norway," Discussion Papers 784, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Angela Greulich & Michael Rendall, 2014. "Multiple imputation for demographic hazard models with left-censored predictor variables," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01298942, HAL.
    3. Marcantonio Caltabiano & Chiara Ludovica Comolli & Alessandro Rosina, 2017. "The effect of the Great Recession on permanent childlessness in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(20), pages 635-668, September.
    4. Michael Rendall & Angela Greulich, 2016. "Multiple imputation for demographic hazard models with left-censored predictor variables: Application to employment duration and fertility in the EU-SILC," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(38), pages 1135-1148, October.
    5. Marika Jalovaara & Anneli Miettinen, 2013. "Does his paycheck also matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(31), pages 881-916, April.
    6. Daniele Vignoli & Sven Drefahl & Gustavo De Santis, 2012. "Whose job instability affects the likelihood of becoming a parent in Italy? A tale of two partners," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(2), pages 41-62, January.
    7. Angela Greulich & Michael Rendall, 2014. "Multiple imputation for demographic hazard models with left-censored predictor variables," Working Papers hal-01298942, HAL.
    8. Alberto Cazzola & Lucia Pasquini & Aurora Angeli, 2016. "The relationship between unemployment and fertility in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(1), pages 1-38, January.
    9. Francesca Fiori & Francesca Rinesi & Elspeth Graham, 2017. "Choosing to Remain Childless? A Comparative Study of Fertility Intentions Among Women and Men in Italy and Britain," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(3), pages 319-350, July.
    10. Karin E. Lundström & Gunnar Andersson, 2012. "Labor-market status, migrant status and first childbearing in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(25), pages 719-742, December.

  2. Elisabetta Santarelli & Francesco Cottone, 2009. "Leaving home, family support and intergenerational ties in Italy: Some regional differences," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(1), pages 1-22, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Katrin Schwanitz & Clara H. Mulder & Laurent Toulemon, 2017. "Differences in leaving home by individual and parental education among young adults in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(63), pages 1975-2010, December.
    2. Maaike Jappens & Jan Van Bavel, 2012. "Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(4), pages 85-120, July.
    3. Giulia Ferrari & Alessandro Rosina & Emiliano Sironi, 2014. "Beyond Good Intentions: The Decision-Making Process of Leaving the Family of Origin in Italy," Working Papers 060, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    4. Elisabetta Santarelli, 2011. "Economic resources and the first child in Italy: A focus on income and job stability," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(9), pages 311-336, July.
    5. Elena Pirani, 2016. "Intergenerational contact across marriage and cohabitation in Italy. Something new?," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2016_07, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    6. Viviana Amati & Giulia Rivellini & Susanna Zaccarin, 2015. "Potential and Effective Support Networks of Young Italian Adults," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 807-831, July.
    7. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Elena Pirani, 2013. "Will they turn back on you? The relations between young co habiting people and their parents," Working Papers 63, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    8. Marco Tosi, 2017. "Age norms, family relationships, and home leaving in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(9), pages 281-306, January.

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2013-07-05. Author is listed

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