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Age Norms on Leaving Home: Multilevel Evidence from the European Social Survey

Author

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  • Arnstein Aassve

    (“Carlo F Dondena†Center for Research on Social Dynamics and Department of Policy Analysis and Public Management, Università Bocconi, via Röntgen 1, I-20136 Milan, Italy)

  • Bruno Arpino

    (Department of Political and Social Sciences and RECSM, Universitat Pompeu Fabra and “Carlo F Dondena†Center for Research on Social Dynamics, Università Bocconi, Ramon Trias Fargas, 25-27; 08005 Barcelona, Spain)

  • Francesco C Billari

    (Department of Sociology and Nuffield College, University of Oxford, Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UQ, England)

Abstract

Young people leave the parental home at different ages, and differences exist both between and within societies. International comparisons have emphasised the importance of institutions, in particular the welfare regime, the educational system, and the labour market, as well as of long-standing cultural differences. Here we focus on subjective age norms (‘age deadlines’) for leaving home—a key determinant of actual behaviour. We analyse the data of a unique multicountry dataset, the third round of the European Social Survey, through a series of multilevel regression models where simultaneously country, regional, and individual-level factors come into play. We find strong normative differences between countries, and significant, though lower, regional-level variation. Norms are significantly influenced by country-level ‘institutional’ factors, as well as by regional-level ‘cultural’ factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnstein Aassve & Bruno Arpino & Francesco C Billari, 2013. "Age Norms on Leaving Home: Multilevel Evidence from the European Social Survey," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 45(2), pages 383-401, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:envira:v:45:y:2013:i:2:p:383-401
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeong Hwa Ho, 2015. "The problem group? Psychological wellbeing of unmarried people living alone in the Republic of Korea," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(47), pages 1299-1328, June.
    2. Olga Cantó & Inmaculada Cebrián & Gloria Moreno, 2019. "Household precariousness and youth living arrangements in Spain: evidence for a complete business cycle," Working Papers 499, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:63 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Pau Baizan & Bruno Arpino & Carlos Eric Delclòs, 2016. "The Effect of Gender Policies on Fertility: The Moderating Role of Education and Normative Context," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 1-30, February.
    5. Bernhard Nauck & Nicolai Gröpler & Chin-Chun Yi, 2017. "How kinship systems and welfare regimes shape leaving home: A comparative study of the United States, Germany, Taiwan, and China," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(38), pages 1109-1148, April.
    6. Raffaele Guetto & Moreno Mancosu & Stefani Scherer & Giulia Torricelli, 2016. "The Spreading of Cohabitation as a Diffusion Process: Evidence from Italy," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(5), pages 661-686, December.
    7. Agnese Vitali & Bruno Arpino, 2016. "Who brings home the bacon? The influence of context on partners' contributions to the household income," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(41), pages 1213-1244, October.
    8. Marco Tosi, 2017. "Age norms, family relationships, and home leaving in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(9), pages 281-306, January.

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