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Impacts of Employment Regulation: Towards an Evaluation Framework

  • Borland, Jeff

    ()

    (Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand)

The main objective of this report is to propose an approach for evaluating the impact of employment regulation on innovation, productivity and economic growth in the New Zealand economy. The report provides: a characterisation of the main types of employment regulation and objectives; a presentation of a conceptual framework to represent the effects of employment regulation on innovation, productivity and growth; a summary of the main empirical findings on effects of employment regulation; a description and evaluation of alternative empirical methodologies; and a recommended approach for research in New Zealand.

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File URL: http://www.med.govt.nz/about-us/publications/publications-by-topic/occasional-papers/2006/06-07-pdf/view
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Paper provided by Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand in its series Occasional Papers with number 06/7.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2005
Handle: RePEc:ris:nzmedo:2006_007
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