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Government-sponsored labour-market training and output growth - cyclical, structural and globalization influences

Listed author(s):
  • Eleftherios Goulas

    ()

    (Department of Law & Finance, Bedfordshire University, UK)

  • Athina Zervoyianni

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Patras, Greece; The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

Empirical work on the effects of government-sponsored labour-market training programs (LTPs) has been largely focused on the unemployment-exit and employment-entry probabilities of program participants using micro-level data. This paper seeks to add to the current literature by providing broad cross-country evidence on whether or not additional public-sector resources allocated to LTPs contributes to raising output growth and per-capita incomes. Using data from OECD countries during 1989-2009 and GMM estimation, we find evidence suggesting that on average labour-market training programs are growth-enhancing. The positive growth-effect of LTP-spending is found to be stronger the more favourable are business-cycle conditions, the larger is the magnitude of structural shocks at country level and the greater is the scale of opening-up of markets at the global level.

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File URL: http://www.rcea.org/RePEc/pdf/wp17-19.pdf
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Paper provided by The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis in its series Working Paper Series with number 17-19.

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Date of creation: Jul 2017
Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:17-19
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  1. Conny Wunsch & Michael Lechner, 2008. "What Did All the Money Do? On the General Ineffectiveness of Recent West German Labour Market Programmes," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 134-174, 02.
  2. Aderonke Osikominu, 2013. "Quick Job Entry or Long-Term Human Capital Development? The Dynamic Effects of Alternative Training Schemes," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 313-342.
  3. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
  4. Alan Barrett & Philip J. O'Connell, 2001. "Does Training Generally Work? The Returns to in-Company Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(3), pages 647-662, April.
  5. Michael Lechner & Ruth Miquel & Conny Wunsch, 2011. "Long‐Run Effects Of Public Sector Sponsored Training In West Germany," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 742-784, August.
  6. Alessio Brown & Johannes Koettl, 2015. "Active labor market programs - employment gain or fiscal drain?," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-36, December.
  7. Boothby, Daniel & Dufour, Anik & Tang, Jianmin, 2010. "Technology adoption, training and productivity performance," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 650-661, June.
  8. Stephen DeLoach & Mark Kurt, 2013. "Discouraging Workers: Estimating the Impacts of Macroeconomic Shocks on the Search Intensity of the Unemployed," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 433-454, December.
  9. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2006. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Evidence from British Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 397-421, August.
  10. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  11. Matz Dahlberg & Anders Forslund, 2005. "Direct Displacement Effects of Labour Market Programmes," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(3), pages 475-494, September.
  12. Knut Røed & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2006. "Do Labour Market Programmes Speed up the Return to Work?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(5), pages 541-568, October.
  13. Henrik Braconier & Giuseppe Nicoletti & Ben Westmore, 2015. "Policy challenges for the next 50 years," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2015(1), pages 9-66.
  14. Jespersen, Svend T. & Munch, Jakob R. & Skipper, Lars, 2008. "Costs and benefits of Danish active labour market programmes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 859-884, October.
  15. Gérard Ballot & Fathi Fakhfakh & Erol Taymaz, 2006. "Who Benefits from Training and R&D, the Firm or the Workers?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(3), pages 473-495, 09.
  16. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
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