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Technology adoption, training and productivity performance

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  • Boothby, Daniel
  • Dufour, Anik
  • Tang, Jianmin

Abstract

Advanced technologies are commonly thought to be complementary to skills. Firms that adopt new technologies (for example, computer-aided design and control) and at the same time invest in skills (for example, training in computer literacy and technical skills) are expected to realize greater productivity gains than those that do not. To validate this expectation, this paper first identifies the combinations of technologies and types of training that are commonly undertaken by firms, presumably as part of their strategies to effectively utilize the adopted technologies and to improve their economic performance. This paper then estimates the relationship between these common technology-training combinations and productivity performance. It shows that these combinations are associated with higher productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Boothby, Daniel & Dufour, Anik & Tang, Jianmin, 2010. "Technology adoption, training and productivity performance," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 650-661, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:39:y:2010:i:5:p:650-661
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cynthia Williams & Yara Asi & Amanda Raffenaud & Matt Bagwell & Ibrahim Zeini, 2016. "The effect of information technology on hospital performance," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 338-346, December.
    2. Adriaan Zon & Roberto Antonietti, 2016. "Education and training in a model of endogenous growth with creative wear-and-tear," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(1), pages 35-62, April.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:12:p:2354-:d:123256 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Maria del Sorbo & Fernando Hervás Soriano, 2013. "Mind the Science and Technology Skills Gap," JRC Working Papers JRC83766, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    5. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1721-:d:113258 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:1:p:289-304 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Eleftherios Goulas & Athina Zervoyianni, 2017. "Government-sponsored labour-market training and output growth - cyclical, structural and globalization influences," Working Paper series 17-19, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    8. Daria Ciriaci, 2017. "Intangible resources: the relevance of training for European firms’ innovative performance," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(1), pages 31-54, April.

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