IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rie/riecdt/63.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Climate change: policies to manage its macroeconomic and financial effects

Author

Listed:
  • Bernal-Ramirez, Joaquin
  • Ocampo, José Antonio

Abstract

It is increasingly recognized that climate change generates major macroeconomic and financial risks. There are physical risks associated to the disasters generated by hydrometeorological events and to gradual but persistent changes in temperatures that have structural impacts on economic activity, productivity and incomes. Additionally, the process of adjustment towards a lower-carbon economy, prompted by changes in climate-related policies, technological disruptions and changes in consumer preferences, generates transition risks. After a brief analysis of the macroeconomic, fiscal and tax policies to manage these risks, this paper concentrates on: (i) how financial policies can help improve transparency and climate-related risk disclosure in financial institutions’ balance sheets and assets prices,particularly with appropriate prudential regulation and supervision; and (ii) how those risks could be taken into account in monetary policy and central banks’ balance sheets and operations. The paper ends with some reflections on the Covid-19 pandemic and the will for a “green” recovery.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernal-Ramirez, Joaquin & Ocampo, José Antonio, 2020. "Climate change: policies to manage its macroeconomic and financial effects," Working papers 63, Red Investigadores de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:rie:riecdt:63
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://repositorio.banrep.gov.co/bitstream/handle/20.500.12134/9897/be_1127.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ingo Fender & Mike McMorrow & Vahe Sahakyan & Omar Zulaica, 2019. "Green bonds: the reserve management perspective," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    2. Simon Dikau & Ulrich Volz, 2019. "Central Bank Mandates, Sustainability Objectives and the Promotion of Green Finance," Working Papers 222, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    3. Werner, Richard A., 2016. "A lost century in economics: Three theories of banking and the conclusive evidence," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 361-379.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; carbon tax; financial policy; monetary policy; central banks;

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rie:riecdt:63. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CAIE). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/redcoea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.