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Central Bank Mandates, Sustainability Objectives and the Promotion of Green Finance

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  • Simon Dikau
  • Ulrich Volz

    (Department of Economics, SOAS University of London, UK)

Abstract

This paper examines to what extent climate-related risks and mitigation policies fit into the current set of central bank mandates and objectives. To this end, we conduct a detailed analysis of central bank mandates and objectives, using the IMF's Central Bank Legislation Database, and compare these to current arrangements and sustainability responsibilities that central banks have adopted in practice. To scrutinise the alignment of mandates with climate-related policies, we differentiate between the impact of environmental factors on the conventional core objectives of central banking, and a potential promotional role of central banks with regard to green finance and sustainability. Of the 133 central banks in our sample, only 12% have explicit sustainability mandates while 29% are mandated to support the government's policy priorities, which in most cases includes sustainability goals. However, given that climate risks can directly impact on traditional core responsibilities of central banks, most notably monetary and financial stability, even central banks without explicit or implicit sustainability mandate ought to incorporate climate- and mitigation-risks into their core policy implementation frameworks in order to efficiently and successfully safeguard price and financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Dikau & Ulrich Volz, 2019. "Central Bank Mandates, Sustainability Objectives and the Promotion of Green Finance," Working Papers 222, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:soa:wpaper:222
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    2. Clara I. González & Soledad Núñez, 2019. "Mercados, entidades financieras y bancos centrales ante el cambio climático: retos y oportunidades," Working Papers 2019-06, FEDEA.
    3. Bernal-Ramirez, Joaquin & Ocampo, José Antonio, 2020. "Climate change: policies to manage its macroeconomic and financial effects," Working papers 63, Red Investigadores de Economía.
    4. Kakuho Furukawa & Hibiki Ichiue & Noriyuki Shiraki, 2020. "How Does Climate Change Interact with the Financial System? A Survey," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 20-E-8, Bank of Japan.
    5. Baer, Moritz & Campiglio, Emanuele & Deyris, Jérôme, 2021. "It takes two to dance: Institutional dynamics and climate-related financial policies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 190(C).
    6. Channing Arndt & Chris Loewald & Konstantin Makrelov, 2020. "Climate change and its implications for central banks in emerging and developing economies," Working Papers 10001, South African Reserve Bank.
    7. Diluiso, Francesca & Annicchiarico, Barbara & Kalkuhl, Matthias & Minx, Jan C., 2021. "Climate actions and macro-financial stability: The role of central banks," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).
    8. Xi Chen & Zhigang Chen, 2021. "Can Green Finance Development Reduce Carbon Emissions? Empirical Evidence from 30 Chinese Provinces," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(21), pages 1-18, November.
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    10. Francesca Diluiso & Barbara Annicchiarico & Matthias Kalkuhl & Jan C. Minx, 2020. "Climate Actions and Stranded Assets: The Role of Financial Regulation and Monetary Policy," CEIS Research Paper 501, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 22 Jul 2020.
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    14. Ingo Fender & Mike McMorrow & Vahe Sahakyan & Omar Zulaica, 2020. "Reserve management and sustainability: the case for green bonds?," BIS Working Papers 849, Bank for International Settlements.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central banks; central bank mandates; green finance;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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