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Central Bank Mandates, Sustainability Objectives and the Promotion of Green Finance

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  • Simon Dikau

    ()

  • Ulrich Volz

    () (Department of Economics, SOAS University of London, UK)

Abstract

This paper examines to what extent climate-related risks and mitigation policies fit into the current set of central bank mandates and objectives. To this end, we conduct a detailed analysis of central bank mandates and objectives, using the IMF's Central Bank Legislation Database, and compare these to current arrangements and sustainability responsibilities that central banks have adopted in practice. To scrutinise the alignment of mandates with climate-related policies, we differentiate between the impact of environmental factors on the conventional core objectives of central banking, and a potential promotional role of central banks with regard to green finance and sustainability. Of the 133 central banks in our sample, only 12% have explicit sustainability mandates while 29% are mandated to support the government's policy priorities, which in most cases includes sustainability goals. However, given that climate risks can directly impact on traditional core responsibilities of central banks, most notably monetary and financial stability, even central banks without explicit or implicit sustainability mandate ought to incorporate climate- and mitigation-risks into their core policy implementation frameworks in order to efficiently and successfully safeguard price and financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Dikau & Ulrich Volz, 2019. "Central Bank Mandates, Sustainability Objectives and the Promotion of Green Finance," Working Papers 222, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:soa:wpaper:222
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    File URL: https://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/research/workingpapers/file139494.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Warwick McKibbin & Adele Morris & Augustus J. Panton & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 2017. "Climate change and monetary policy: Dealing with disruption," CAMA Working Papers 2017-77, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Enrique Mendoza, 2016. "Macroprudential Policy: Promise and Challenges," PIER Working Paper Archive 16-020, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 24 Oct 2016.
    3. Campiglio, Emanuele & Dafermos, Yannis & Monnin, Pierre & Ryan-Collins, Josh & Schotten, Guido & Tanaka, Misa, 2018. "Climate change challenges for central banks and financial regulators," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88364, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Enrique G. Mendoza, 2016. "Macroprudential Policy: Promise and Challenges," NBER Working Papers 22868, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bruce C. Greenwald & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1986. "Externalities in Economies with Imperfect Information and Incomplete Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 101(2), pages 229-264.
    6. Batten,, Sandra & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon & Tanaka, Misa, 2016. "Let’s talk about the weather: the impact of climate change on central banks," Bank of England working papers 603, Bank of England.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clara I. González & Soledad Núñez, 2019. "Mercados, entidades financieras y bancos centrales ante el cambio climático: retos y oportunidades," Working Papers 2019-06, FEDEA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central banks; central bank mandates; green finance;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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