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The Employment and Output Effects of Short-Time Work in Germany

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  • Russell Cooper

    (Penn State University)

Abstract

We study the employment and output effects of the short-time work (STW) policy in Ger- many between 2009 and 2010. This intervention facilitated reductions in hours worked per employee with the goal of preventing layoffs. Using confidential German micro-level data we estimate a search model with heterogeneous multi-worker firms. Our findings suggest that STW can prevent increases in unemployment during a recession. However, the policy leads to a decrease in the allocative efficiency of the labor market, resulting in significant output losses.

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  • Russell Cooper, 2017. "The Employment and Output Effects of Short-Time Work in Germany," 2017 Meeting Papers 613, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed017:613
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kudoh, Noritaka & Sasaki, Masaru, 2011. "Employment and hours of work," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 176-192, February.
    2. Cahuc, Pierre & Carcillo, Stéphane, 2011. "Is Short-Time Work a Good Method to Keep Unemployment Down?," IZA Discussion Papers 5430, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Burdett, Kenneth & Wright, Randall, 1989. "Unemployment Insurance and Short-Time Compensation: The Effects on Layoffs, Hours per Worker, and Wages," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1479-1496, December.
    4. Kohlbrecher, Britta & Merkl, Christian & Nordmeier, Daniela, 2016. "Revisiting the matching function," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 350-374.
    5. Björn Brügemann & Pieter Gautier & Guido Menzio, 2015. "Intra Firm Bargaining and Shapley Values," NBER Working Papers 21508, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Russell W. Cooper & Immo Schott, 2013. "Capital Reallocation and Aggregate Productivity," NBER Working Papers 19715, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Balleer, Almut & Gehrke, Britta & Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian, 2016. "Does short-time work save jobs? A business cycle analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 99-122.
    8. Kruppe, Thomas & Scholz, Theresa, 2014. "Labour hoarding in Germany : employment effects of short-time work during the crises," IAB Discussion Paper 201417, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:izalpo:v:8:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1186_s40173-019-0107-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Helge Braun & Björn Brügemann, 2014. "Welfare Effects of Short-Time Compensation," CESifo Working Paper Series 5063, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Volker Meier, 2018. "Short-time Work Subsidies in a Matching Model," CESifo Working Paper Series 7281, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Pierre Cahuc & Francis Kramarz & Sandra Nevoux, 2018. "When Short-Time Work Works," Sciences Po publications 2018-03, Sciences Po.
    5. Giulia Giupponi & Camille Landais, 2018. "Subsidizing Labor Hoarding in Recessions: The Employment & Welfare Effects of Short Time Work," CEP Discussion Papers dp1585, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Reamonn Lydon & Thomas Y. Mathä & Stephen Millard, 2019. "Short-time work in the Great Recession: firm-level evidence from 20 EU countries," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-29, December.
    7. Cahuc, Pierre & Nevoux, Sandra, 2017. "Inefficient Short-Time Work," CEPR Discussion Papers 12269, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Naudé, Wim & Nagler, Paula, 2017. "Technological Innovation and Inclusive Growth in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 11194, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Giupponi, Giulia & Landais, Camille, 2018. "Subsidizing labor hoarding in recessions: the employment and welfare effects of short time work," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 91708, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Wim Naudé & Paula Nagler, 2018. "Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Productivity in Germany, 1871-2015," SPRU Working Paper Series 2018-02, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School.
    11. Gehrke, Britta & Hochmuth, Brigitte, 2017. "Counteracting unemployment in crises : non-linear effects of short-time work policy," IAB Discussion Paper 201727, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes

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