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Experience and Worker Flows

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  • Aspen Gorry

    (UC, Santa Cruz)

Abstract

This paper studies a labor market where workers have incomplete information about the quality of their employment match. The model allows past experience to provide information about the quality of a new match. Allowing workers to learn from past job experience generates a decline in job finding and job separation rates with age that is consistent with patterns found in the data. To provide evidence of this learning mechanism, the model generates a prediction that wage volatility on a new job should decline with past job experience. This decline in wage volatility is documented in data from NLSY79.

Suggested Citation

  • Aspen Gorry, 2012. "Experience and Worker Flows," 2012 Meeting Papers 154, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:154
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ludo Visschers & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2011. "Unemployment and Endogenous Reallocation over the Business Cycle," 2011 Meeting Papers 1101, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Guido Menzio & Irina Telyukova & Ludo Visschers, 2016. "Directed Search over the Life Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 38-62, January.
    3. Pries, Michael J., 2016. "Uncertainty-driven labor market fluctuations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 181-199.
    4. Gorry, Aspen, 2013. "Minimum wages and youth unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 57-75.
    5. Gervais, Martin & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E. & Yedid-Levi, Yaniv, 2016. "What should I be when I grow up? Occupations and unemployment over the life cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 54-70.
    6. Basit Zafar, 2011. "How Do College Students Form Expectations?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 301-348.
    7. Ludo Visschers & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2011. "Unemployment and Endogenous Reallocation over the Business Cycle," 2011 Meeting Papers 1101, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Ludo Visschers & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2011. "Unemployment and Endogenous Reallocation over the Business Cycle," 2011 Meeting Papers 1101, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Esteban-Pretel, Julen & Fujimoto, Junichi, 2012. "Life-cycle search, match quality and Japan’s labor market," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 326-350.
    10. Katarina Borovickova, 2012. "Learning and Labor Market Flows," 2012 Meeting Papers 652, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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