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Experience and Worker Flows

  • Aspen Gorry

    (UC, Santa Cruz)

This paper studies a labor market where workers have incomplete information about the quality of their employment match. The model allows past experience to provide information about the quality of a new match. Allowing workers to learn from past job experience generates a decline in job finding and job separation rates with age that is consistent with patterns found in the data. To provide evidence of this learning mechanism, the model generates a prediction that wage volatility on a new job should decline with past job experience. This decline in wage volatility is documented in data from NLSY79.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2012 Meeting Papers with number 154.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:154
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  21. Fabian Lange, 2007. "The Speed of Employer Learning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 1-35.
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