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Australian Renewable Energy Policy: Barriers and Challenges

Author

Listed:
  • Liam Byrnes

    () (Department of Economics, University of Queensland)

  • Colin Brown

    () (School of Agriculture and Food Sciences)

  • John Foster

    () (Department of Economics, University of Queensland)

  • Liam Wagner

    () (Department of Economics, University of Queensland)

Abstract

Australia’s renewable energy policy has taken significant steps towards encouraging the deployment of lower carbon emissions energy generation. Effective policy and regulatory frameworks are paramount to incentivising the deployment of renewable energy to achieve long term reductions in carbon emissions. However significant policy barriers still exist at the federal and state levels, which have reduced the effectiveness of a concerted national effort to deploy renewables. The current policy landscape has largely favoured mature technologies which present the lowest investment risk at the expense of emerging options which may present greater efficiency and emissions reduction gains. The lack of support for emerging technologies delays their effective deployment and the accumulation of highly skilled human capital, until the medium to long term. This paper outlines the key policy frameworks, incentives and regulatory environment which encompasses the renewable energy sector, and presents a critical analysis of the barriers faced by the industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Liam Byrnes & Colin Brown & John Foster & Liam Wagner, 2013. "Australian Renewable Energy Policy: Barriers and Challenges," Energy Economics and Management Group Working Papers 2-2013, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqeemg:2-2013
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/eemg/docs/workingpapers/2013-02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Australia; Renewable Energy; Energy Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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