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Immigrant Selection Systems and Occupational Outcomes of International Medical Graduates in Canada and the United States

  • James Ted McDonald

    ()

    (University of New Brunswick)

  • Casey Warman

    ()

    (Queen's University)

  • Christopher Worswick

    ()

    (Carleton University)

We analyze the process of immigrant selection and occupational outcomes of International Medical Graduates (IMGs) in the US and Canada. We extend the IMG relicensing model of Kugler and Sauer (2005) to incorporate two different approaches to immigrant selection: employer nomination systems and point systems. Analysis of the model indicates that point systems can allow IMGs to immigrate who would be unable to gain entry to the receiving country under an employer nomination system and who are subsequently unable to relicense and work as physicians in the receiving country. We apply the model to the case of IMGs migrating to the US and Canada since the 1960s and evaluate the empirical predictions from the model based on an analysis of the occupational outcomes of IMGs in Canada (where a point system has been in place) and in the US (where IMGs enter through employer nomination). In Canada, IMGs are less likely to be employed as a physician than are IMGs in the US and a large percentage of the IMGs in Canada either find work in lower skill occupations or are not employed. The empirical findings are consistent with our hypotheses based on the theoretical framework on the effects of immigrant selection systems on the probability of working as a physician in the two countries.

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File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca/working_papers/papers/qed_wp_1285.pdf
File Function: First version 2011
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Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1285.

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Length: 53 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:1285
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  1. David J . Bashaw & John S . Heywood, 2001. "The Gender Earnings Gap for US Physicians: Has Equality been Achieved?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(3), pages 371-391, 09.
  2. Hinte, Holger & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2011. "Report No. 35: Ein Punktesystem zur bedarfsorientierten Steuerung der Zuwanderung nach Deutschland," IZA Research Reports 35, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. George J. Borjas, 1993. "Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 21-44 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Aydemir, Abdurrahman & Skuterud, Mikal, 2004. "Explaining the Deteriorating Entry Earnings of Canada's Immigrant Cohorts: 1966-2000," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004225e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  5. Adriana Kugler & Robert M. Sauer, 2004. "Doctors Without Borders? Re-licensing Requirements and Negative Selection in the Market for Physicians," Working Papers 133, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  6. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Trejo, Stephen, 2001. "Immigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 363, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Mark C. Regets & Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1999. "Immigrants and Human-Capital Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 186-191, May.
  8. Charles Beach & Alan G. Green & Christopher Worswick, 2006. "Impacts of the Point System and Immigration Policy Levers on Skill Characteristics of Canadian Immigrants," Working Papers 1115, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  9. Susumu Imai & Derek Stacey & Casey Warman, 2011. "From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Occupational Skills and the Economic Outcomes of Immigrants," Working Papers 1275, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  10. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Stephen J. Trejo, 2001. "The Skills of Female Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-12, Claremont Colleges.
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