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Immigrant Selection Systems and Occupational Outcomes of International Medical Graduates in Canada and the United States

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  • James Ted McDonald
  • Casey Warman
  • Christopher Worswick

Abstract

We analyze the process of immigrant selection and occupational outcomes of international medical graduates (IMGs) in the United States and Canada. We find that in Canada, where a point system has been in place, IMGs are less likely to be employed as physicians than are IMGs in the United States, where employer nomination is a more important entry path for IMGs. We also find that when the point system in Canada did not have occupational restrictions, IMGs had a relatively low probability of working as physicians.

Suggested Citation

  • James Ted McDonald & Casey Warman & Christopher Worswick, 2015. "Immigrant Selection Systems and Occupational Outcomes of International Medical Graduates in Canada and the United States," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 41(s1), pages 116-137, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:41:y:2015:i:s1:p:116-137
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cpp.2013-054
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Stephen J. Trejo, 2003. "Immigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    2. Susumu Imai & Derek G. Stacey & Casey Warman, 2011. "From Engineer To Taxi Driver? Occupational Skills And The Economic Outcomes Of Immigrants," Working Paper 1275, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    3. Hinte, Holger & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2011. "Ein Punktesystem zur bedarfsorientierten Steuerung der Zuwanderung nach Deutschland," IZA Research Reports 35, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Mark C. Regets & Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1999. "Immigrants and Human-Capital Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 186-191, May.
    5. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Stephen J. Trejo, 2001. "The Skills of Female Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-12, Claremont Colleges.
    6. Adriana D. Kugler & Robert M. Sauer, 2005. "Doctors without Borders? Relicensing Requirements and Negative Selection in the Market for Physicians," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(3), pages 437-466, July.
    7. David J . Bashaw & John S . Heywood, 2001. "The Gender Earnings Gap for US Physicians: Has Equality been Achieved?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(3), pages 371-391, September.
    8. Charles M. Beach & Alan G. Green & Christopher Worswick, 2007. "Impacts of the Point System and Immigration Policy Levers on Skill Characteristics of Canadian Immigrants," Research in Labor Economics,in: Immigration, volume 27, pages 349-401 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. George J. Borjas, 1993. "Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 21-44 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Mikal Skuterud, 2005. "Explaining the deteriorating entry earnings of Canada's immigrant cohorts, 1966 - 2000," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 641-672, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neeraj Kaushal & Yao Lu & Nicole Denier & Julia Shu-Huah Wang & Stephen J. Trejo, 2016. "Immigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1249-1277, October.
    2. Grubel, Herbert & Grady, Patrick, 2012. "Fiscal transfers to immigrants in Canada: responding to critics and a revised estimate," MPRA Paper 37406, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Mar 2012.
    3. Michel Grignon & Yaw Owusu & Arthur Sweetman, 2013. "The international migration of health professionals," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 4, pages 75-97 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Christopher Worswick, 2013. "Improving Immigrant Selection: Further Changes Are Required Before Increasing Inflows," e-briefs 157, C.D. Howe Institute.
    5. repec:kap:ejlwec:v:45:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10657-018-9583-x is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:bla:coecpo:v:35:y:2017:i:1:p:216-231 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J80 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - General

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