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Skilled immigrants' contribution to productive efficiency

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  • Deahoon Nahm
  • Massimiliano Tani

Abstract

This paper studies whether skilled migrants contribute to the host country's ‘productive efficiency’ (Farrell 1957) using input–output and immigration sectoral data for 7 industries in 12 countries during the period 1999–2001. We find that skilled migrants contribute positively to a country's productive efficiency with the exception of the finance sector. The results broadly support the adoption of skill-biased migration policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Deahoon Nahm & Massimiliano Tani, 2015. "Skilled immigrants' contribution to productive efficiency," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 594-612, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rjapxx:v:20:y:2015:i:4:p:594-612
    DOI: 10.1080/13547860.2015.1045325
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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