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The effects of a change in the point system on immigration: evidence from the 2001 Quebec reform

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  • Matthieu Chemin

    () (McGill University)

  • Nagham Sayour

    () (McGill University)

Abstract

Abstract In 2001, Quebec changed its point system, a system that selects immigrants based on specific observable characteristics. The explicit objective was to increase the number of French-speaking immigrants, with no deterioration in overall labor market performance. To achieve this, points for French and education (specifically bachelor’s degrees) were increased. In parallel, points for a subjective assessment of “adaptability” were decreased. In line with the initial objective, we find more French-speaking immigrants with bachelor’s degrees, and no worsening in labor market outcomes after the reform. These results hold in a difference-in-differences and triple differences analysis. This paper shows how point systems can be used to shape the immigrant workforce according to policy goals.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthieu Chemin & Nagham Sayour, 2016. "The effects of a change in the point system on immigration: evidence from the 2001 Quebec reform," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1217-1247, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:29:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-016-0594-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-016-0594-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Point system; Labor market integration;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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