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Do Selection Criteria Make a Difference? Visa Category and the Labour Market Status of Immigrants to Australia

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  • Cobb-Clark, Deborah A

Abstract

This paper assesses the role of selection criteria in the immigrant settlement process. Do skill-based immigrants have higher participation and employment rates than family-based immigrants? Does this represent a head start or a persistent labour market advantage? The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia is used to address these questions. Generally, migrants selected for their skills have better labour market outcomes. Over time, the relative gap in participation rates increases, while the gap in employment rates decreases. Net of visa category, outcomes are better for native English speakers and for those who visited Australia prior to migration. Copyright 2000 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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  • Cobb-Clark, Deborah A, 2000. "Do Selection Criteria Make a Difference? Visa Category and the Labour Market Status of Immigrants to Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(232), pages 15-31, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:232:p:15-31
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    Cited by:

    1. Mahuteau, Stéphane & Piracha, Matloob & Tani, Massimiliano, 2010. "Selection Policy and Immigrants' Remittance Behaviour," IZA Discussion Papers 4874, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Ahn T. Le, 2003. "Female Labour Market Participation: Differences Between Primary and Tied Movers," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 03-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    3. Miguel Ángel Alcobendas & Núria Rodríquez-Planas, 2010. "Immigrants' Assimilation Process In A Segmented Labor Market," Working Papers 442, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Green, Colin & Kler, Parvinder & Leeves, Gareth, 2007. "Immigrant overeducation: Evidence from recent arrivals to Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 420-432.
    5. Stéphane Mahuteau & P.N. (Raja) Junankar, 2008. "Do Migrants get Good Jobs in Australia? The Role of Ethnic Networks in Job Search," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, pages 115-130.
    6. Mahuteau, Stephane & Junankar, Pramod, 2007. "Do Migrants succeed in the Australian Labour Market? Furher Evidence on Job Quality," MPRA Paper 8703, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2008.
    7. Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2014. "Skill-based immigration, economic integration, and economic performance," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-41.
    8. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2006. "Selection Policy and the Labour Market Outcomes of New Immigrants," Chapters,in: Public Policy and Immigrant Settlement, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Alcobendas, Miguel Angel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2009. "Immigrants' Assimilation Process in a Segmented Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 4394, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Chiswick, Barry R. & Lee, Yew Liang & Miller, Paul W., 2002. "Immigrants' Language Skills: The Australian Experience in a Longitudinal Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 502, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Núria Rodríguez-Planas & Raquel Vegas, 2011. "Moroccans' Assimilation In Spain: Family-Based Versus Labor-Based Migration," Middle East Development Journal (MEDJ), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(02), pages 119-139.
    12. Cat Moody, 2006. "Migration and Economic Growth: a 21st Century Perspective," Treasury Working Paper Series 06/02, New Zealand Treasury.
    13. Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2013. "Skill-based immigrant selection and labor market outcomes by visa category," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 23, pages 432-452 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Barry R. Chiswick & Yew Liang Lee & Paul W. Miller, 2002. "Immigrants' Language Skills: The Australian Experience," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 02-07, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    15. Justin van de Ven & Sarah Voitchovsky, 2015. "Skilled migrants and labour market integration: how important is the selection process?," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), pages 1-28.
    16. Laura Hill & Joseph Hayes, 2011. "How would selecting for skill change flows of immigrants to the United States? A simulation of three merit-based point systems," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-23, March.
    17. Karin Eriksson & Randi Hjalmarsson & Matthew Lindquist & Anna Sandberg, 2016. "The importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of crime," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 219-262.
    18. Prem Thapa, 2004. "On The Risk Of Unemployment: A Comparative Assessment of the Labour Market Success of Migrants in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers 473, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

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