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Firm- specific human capital in different market conditions: evidence from the Japanese football league

Author

Listed:
  • Yamamura, Eiji
  • Ohtake, Fumio

Abstract

This paper examined how meeting the team-specific human capital is important in a football player’s performance by comparing the top two league teams. From panel data of the Japan Professional Football League, we find that changing the team reduced a player’s performance and that the team’s performance improved as each player’s tenure in the team increased, the returns from team-specific skills over time increased and then decreased as the years passed, the benefit from moving to a new team depends on the timing of moving, and neither tenure in the team nor experience affects a professional football player’s performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji & Ohtake, Fumio, 2019. "Firm- specific human capital in different market conditions: evidence from the Japanese football league," MPRA Paper 94977, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:94977
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/94977/1/MPRA_paper_94977.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Brown, James N, 1989. "Why Do Wages Increase with Tenure? On-the-Job Training and Life-Cycle Wage Growth Observed within Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 971-991, December.
    4. Akihiko Kawaura & Sumner Croix, 2016. "Integration Of North And South American Players In Japan'S Professional Baseball Leagues," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 1107-1130, August.
    5. Chapman, Kenneth S & Southwick, Lawrence, Jr, 1991. "Testing the Matching Hypothesis: The Case of Major-League Baseball," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1352-1360, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Firm-specific human capital; Professional football; Player performance; Matching;

    JEL classification:

    • J49 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Other
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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