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Diamonds are Forever: Job-Matching and Career Success of Young Workers

Author

Listed:
  • Göke Stefan

    () (Department of Management, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33098 Paderborn, Germany)

  • Prinz Joachim

    () (Department of Managerial Economics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 53, 47057 Duisburg, Germany)

  • Weimar Daniel

    () (Department of Managerial Economics, University of Duisburg- Essen, Lotharstrasse 53, 47057 Duisburg, Germany)

Abstract

This study addresses the probability of young workers seeking for promotion after vocational training. By applying semi-parametric duration analysis with competing risks to a dataset of 17 youth rosters, each of them winner of either DFB-U19-Bundesliga or DFB-Youth-Cup between 1998/1999 and 2010/2011, the following paper tests some predictions that have emerged from Jovanovic’s (1979) matching theory. By running a youth academy a club assembles private information in order to decrease information deficits about a youth player’s performance. Findings from a database that covers 270 German youth players indicate that productivity, tenure and job seniority are key determinants for a successful debut with the home club. These results were not detected for potential debuts with an outside team after finishing youth engagement.

Suggested Citation

  • Göke Stefan & Prinz Joachim & Weimar Daniel, 2014. "Diamonds are Forever: Job-Matching and Career Success of Young Workers," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(4), pages 450-473, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:234:y:2014:i:4:p:450-473
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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