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Gain versus pain from status and ambition: Effects on growth and inequality

  • Tournemaine, Frederic
  • Tsoukis, Christopher

To shed lights on growth, distribution and the relationships between the two, we develop a growth model with heterogeneous individuals who care about social status. Individuals' heterogeneity stems from two sources: their innate skills and their degree of ambition. While the willingness of individuals to accumulate wealth depends whether they experience gain or pain from loss of status, we show that ambition of individuals plays an important role regarding growth and distribution: ambition can inhibit or foster accumulation of wealth, then in turn growth. In such a context, we show that growth can be positively or negatively correlated with inequalities.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/8670/1/MPRA_paper_8670.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 8670.

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Date of creation: Feb 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:8670
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