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Sources of unemployment in Namibia: an application of the structural VAR approach

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  • Sunde, Tafirenyika
  • Akanbi, Olusegun Ayodele

Abstract

The main purpose of the research was to establish the sources of unemployment in Namibia for the period 1980 to 2013 using the SVAR methodology. Empirical results show that persistently high unemployment is the result of a combination of various shocks as well as the hysteresis mechanism. The impulse response functions and variance decomposition functions agree that labour supply, aggregate demand, and real wages seem to be the critical factors affecting unemployment. Moreover, the price shocks affect unemployment in the long run and productivity shocks explain only a small fraction of the forecast error variance of unemployment in both the short and long run. This finding is consistent with the controversy of uncertain effects of productivity shocks on the unemployment rate. Aggregate demand policies, deregulation policies and structural labour market reforms can be useful policy instruments to tackle unemployment in Namibia.

Suggested Citation

  • Sunde, Tafirenyika & Akanbi, Olusegun Ayodele, 2015. "Sources of unemployment in Namibia: an application of the structural VAR approach," MPRA Paper 86578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:86578
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    Cited by:

    1. Henry Ngongo & Antoine Miyamueni, 2018. "Chocs technologiques, chocs des prix et fluctuations du chômage en République Démocratique du Congo," Post-Print hal-01773922, HAL.
    2. Antoine Kamiantako Miyamueni & Henry Ngongo Muganza, 2018. "Chocs technologiques, chocs des prix et fluctuations du ch\^omage en R\'epublique D\'emocratique du Congo," Papers 1804.09532, arXiv.org.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment; Structural VAR; Impulse response; Variance decomposition; Namibia;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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