IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/80781.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Human Capital Flows in Failing Organizations: An Integrated Conceptual Framework

Author

Listed:
  • Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph

Abstract

Purpose – The paper examines the dynamics of human capital accumulation and human capital depletion in the processes leading to business failure. Design/methodology/approach – Building on the human capital theory, strategic human resource and business failure literature, this paper develops a conceptual framework which links the inward and outward dimensions of human capital flows in the business failure process. Findings – The analysis sheds light on why some highly skilled individuals may opt to flee declining firms to avoid being stigmatised whilst others become motivated to joint such firms. Research limitations/implications – The paper suggests that understanding the nature and dynamics of both flows are essential when seeking to avert collapse. Originality/value –In spite of a growing body of research on business failure and intense competition for top talent, much of the existing literature has circumvented the relationship between them. This study develops a unified model towards enhancing our understanding of the human capital flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2017. "Human Capital Flows in Failing Organizations: An Integrated Conceptual Framework," MPRA Paper 80781, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80781
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/80781/1/MPRA_paper_80781.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. C. Edward Fee, 2003. "Raids, Rewards, and Reputations in the Market for Managerial Talent," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(4), pages 1315-1357.
    2. Boris Groysberg & Linda-Eling Lee & Ashish Nanda, 2008. "Can They Take It With Them? The Portability of Star Knowledge Workers' Performance," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 54(7), pages 1213-1230, July.
    3. Guoli Chen & Donald C. Hambrick, 2012. "CEO Replacement in Turnaround Situations: Executive (Mis)Fit and Its Performance Implications," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 23(1), pages 225-243, February.
    4. Barry L. Bayus & Rajshree Agarwal, 2007. "The Role of Pre-Entry Experience, Entry Timing, and Product Technology Strategies in Explaining Firm Survival," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 53(12), pages 1887-1902, December.
    5. Corey C. Phelps & Hongyan Yang & Kevin Steensma, 2010. "Learning from what others have learned from you: The effects of knowledge spillovers on originating firms," Post-Print hal-00528393, HAL.
    6. Joseph Amankwah-Amoah & Yaw A. Debrah, 2014. "Air Afrique: the demise of a continental icon," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(4), pages 517-546, June.
    7. Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2017. "Cultivating greater self-confidence in African management research," MPRA Paper 79751, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.
    8. Rosalie L. Tung, 2008. "Human Capital or Talent Flows: Implications for Future Directions in Research on Asia Pacific," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 469-472, October.
    9. Donald D. Bergh & Patrick Gibbons, 2011. "The Stock Market Reaction to the Hiring of Management Consultants: A Signalling Theory Approach," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 544-567, May.
    10. Donald C. Hambrick & Richard A. D'Aveni, 1992. "Top Team Deterioration as Part of the Downward Spiral of Large Corporate Bankruptcies," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 38(10), pages 1445-1466, October.
    11. Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2016. "An integrative process model of organisational failure," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 3388-3397.
    12. Derek Laing, 1994. "Involuntary Layoffs in a Model with Asymmetric Information Concerning Worker Ability," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 375-392.
    13. Limor Golan, 2005. "Counteroffers and Efficiency in Labor Markets with Asymmetric Information," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(2), pages 373-393, April.
    14. Boris Groysberg & Linda-Eling Lee, 2009. "Hiring Stars and Their Colleagues: Exploration and Exploitation in Professional Service Firms," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 20(4), pages 740-758, August.
    15. Laing, D., 1990. "Involuntary Layoffs in a Model with Asymmetry Information Concerning Worker Ability," Papers 12-90-4, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    16. Altman, Edward I., 1984. "The success of business failure prediction models : An international survey," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 171-198, June.
    17. Gardner, Timothy M. & Stansbury, Jason & Hart, David, 2010. "The Ethics of Lateral Hiring," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(03), pages 341-369, July.
    18. Jo-Ellen Pozner, 2008. "Stigma and Settling Up: An Integrated Approach to the Consequences of Organizational Misconduct for Organizational Elites," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 141-150, June.
    19. Perri, Timothy J., 1995. "Is there a winner's curse in the labor market?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 79-89, September.
    20. Bernstein, Fernando & Song, Jing-Sheng & Zheng, Xiaona, 2008. ""Bricks-and-mortar" vs. "clicks-and-mortar": An equilibrium analysis," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 187(3), pages 671-690, June.
    21. Dambolena, Ismael G & Khoury, Sarkis J, 1980. " Ratio Stability and Corporate Failure," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 35(4), pages 1017-1026, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    failing organizations; human capital; business failure; personnel poaching.;

    JEL classification:

    • M1 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • M16 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - International Business Administration
    • M3 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80781. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.