IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/80083.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Intra-generational and intergenerational mobility in Vietnam

Author

Listed:
  • Nguyen, Cuong
  • Nguyen, Lam

Abstract

This study examines intra-generational and intergenerational mobility of employment and income in Vietnam during the 2004-2008 and 2010-2014 periods. It finds rather high mobility across income quintiles. There was high mobility of individuals by occupational skills but less mobility by employment status and sectors. The upward mobility of occupation increased over time because of the increase in skilled occupation. The intergenerational elasticity of earnings for parents and children is estimated at around 0.36. The intergenerational elasticity is very similar for 2004 and 2014. Education plays an important role in improving the intergenerational mobility. The intergenerational elasticity for children without education degrees and those with post-secondary degrees is 0.51 and 0.17, respectively. With post-secondary degree, 80% of people whose parents are unskilled have skilled or non-manual occupation.

Suggested Citation

  • Nguyen, Cuong & Nguyen, Lam, 2017. "Intra-generational and intergenerational mobility in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 80083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80083
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/80083/1/MPRA_paper_80083.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Schultz, T., 2002. "Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 207-225, February.
    2. Miles Corak, 2013. "Income Inequality, Equality of Opportunity, and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 79-102, Summer.
    3. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    4. Hertz Tom & Jayasundera Tamara & Piraino Patrizio & Selcuk Sibel & Smith Nicole & Verashchagina Alina, 2008. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-48, January.
    5. Nguyen Viet, Cuong, 2012. "Poverty Dynamics: The Structurally and Stochastically Poor in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 45738, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Cuong, Nguyen Viet & Tung, Phung Duc & Westbrook, Daniel, 2015. "Do the poorest ethnic minorities benefit from a large-scale poverty reduction program? Evidence from Vietnam," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 3-14.
    7. Honge Gong & Andrew Leigh & Xin Meng, 2012. "Intergenerational Income Mobility In Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(3), pages 481-503, September.
    8. Nguyen Viet, Cuong, 2011. "Poverty projection using a small area estimation method: Evidence from Vietnam," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 368-382, September.
    9. M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2011. "Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 427-458.
    10. Fields, Gary S. & Ok, Efe A., 1996. "The Meaning and Measurement of Income Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 349-377, November.
    11. repec:sbe:breart:v:26:y:2006:i:2:a:1576 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Lanjouw, Peter & Marra, Marleen & Nguyen, Cuong, 2013. "Vietnam's evolving poverty map : patterns and implications for policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6355, The World Bank.
    13. Cuong Viet Nguyen & Anh Tran, 2014. "Poverty identification: practice and policy implications in Vietnam," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(1), pages 116-136, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social mobility; intra-generational mobility; intergenerational mobility; occupational mobility; income mobility; Vietnam;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80083. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.