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Socioeconomic determinants of primary school dropout: the logistic model analysis


  • Okumu, Ibrahim M.
  • Nakajjo, Alex
  • Isoke, Doreen


Abstract This paper describes the socioeconomic determinants of primary school dropout in Uganda with the aid of a logistic model analysis using the 2004 National Service Delivery Survey data. The Objectives were to establish the; household socioeconomic factors that influence dropout of pupils given free education and any possible policy alternatives to curb dropout of pupils. Various logistic regressions of primary school dropout were estimated and these took the following dimensions; rural-urban, gender, and age-cohort. After model estimation, marginal effects for each of the models were obtained. The analysis of the various coefficients was done across all models. The results showed the insignificance of distance to school, gender of pupil, gender of household head and total average amount of school dues paid by students in influencing dropout of pupils thus showing the profound impact Universal Primary Education has had on both access to primary education and pupil dropout. Also the results vindicated the importance of parental education, household size and proportion of economically active household members in influencing the chances of pupil dropout. The study finally calls for government to; keep a keen eye on non-school fees payments by parents to schools as these have the potential to increase to unsustainable levels by most households especially in rural areas; roll-out adult education across the entire country; and expand free universal education to secondary and vocational levels as it would allow some of those who can not afford secondary education to continue with schooling. This has the effect of reducing the number of unproductive members in the household.

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  • Okumu, Ibrahim M. & Nakajjo, Alex & Isoke, Doreen, 2008. "Socioeconomic determinants of primary school dropout: the logistic model analysis," MPRA Paper 7851, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:7851

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chernichovsky, Dov, 1985. "Socioeconomic and Demographic Aspects of School Enrollment and Attendance in Rural Botswana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 319-332, January.
    2. Jere R. Behrman & Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig & Prem Vashishtha, 1999. "Women's Schooling, Home Teaching, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(4), pages 682-714, August.
    3. Alain Mingat & Jee-Peng Tan & Shobhana Sosale, 2003. "Tools for education : policy analysis," Post-Print halshs-00006537, HAL.
    4. Deon Filmer & Lant Pritchett, 1999. "The Effect of Household Wealth on Educational Attainment: Evidence from 35 Countries," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(1), pages 85-120.
    5. Odaga, A. & Heneveld, W., 1995. "Girls and Schools in Sub-Saharan Africa. From Analysis to Action," Papers 298, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    6. Sawada, Yasayuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Household schooling decisions in rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2541, The World Bank.
    7. Alain Mingat & Jee-Peng Tan & Shobhana Sosale, 2003. "Tools for Education : Policy Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15161.
    8. Holmes, Jessica, 2003. "Measuring the determinants of school completion in Pakistan: analysis of censoring and selection bias," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 249-264, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hati, Koushik Kumar, 2012. "Can Poverty be Educated Out?," MPRA Paper 57374, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Husain, Zakir & Chatterjee, Amrita, 2009. "Primary completion rates across socio-religious communities in West Bengal," MPRA Paper 21185, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:rss:jnljel:v3i2p1 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dr. Megha Verma & Chhavi Yadav, 2015. "A Study on Factors that Affect School Enrolment and Dropout Rates," Journal of Commerce and Trade, Society for Advanced Management Studies, vol. 10(1), pages 114-121, April.
    5. Husain, Zakir, 2010. "Gender disparities in completing school education in India: Analyzing regional variations," MPRA Paper 25748, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    socioeconomic determinants; primary education; and dropout;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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