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Analyse Du Lien Entre Les Emissions De Co2, Leur Restriction Et La Croissance Economique Du Togo
[Analysis Of The Nexus Between Co2 Emission, Their Restriction And Economic Growth Of Togo]

Author

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  • KPEMOUA, Palakiyem

Abstract

The purposes of this paper are to investigate empirically the impact of carbon dioxide emission and its restriction on Togo’s economic growth with a model that relies on a STIRPAT (Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology) suggested by Ehrlich and Holden (1971; 1972) modified, augmented with the restriction of carbon dioxide emission, and to test the causality between that emission and the economic growth. The empirical methodology is based on the autoregressive distributed lag approach suggested by Mohammad H. Pesaran and al. (2001) and on the cointegration and Toda and Yamamoto’s causality tests. The data cover the period 1960-2011. The results obtained indicate that the impact of carbon dioxide emission on Togo’s economic growth in the long-run is positive and significant. The results show also the existence of causality between carbon dioxide emission and economic growth according to Toda and Yamamoto and significant. Besides, the results indicate that the restriction of carbon dioxide emission by Togo compared with Benin in the long-run is negative and significant, while that restriction compared with Ghana’s is positive and significant on Togo’s economic growth. The results reveal also that Togo undertakes fewer efforts in reduction of carbon dioxide emission compared with Benin but more efforts compared with Ghana.

Suggested Citation

  • KPEMOUA, Palakiyem, 2016. "Analyse Du Lien Entre Les Emissions De Co2, Leur Restriction Et La Croissance Economique Du Togo
    [Analysis Of The Nexus Between Co2 Emission, Their Restriction And Economic Growth Of Togo]
    ," MPRA Paper 77624, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Oct 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77624
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon dioxide; Economic growth; ARDL; cointegration; causality; Togo.;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt
    • O49 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Other
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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