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An Estimate Of The Age Distribution'S Effect On Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Author

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  • STEVEN LUGAUER
  • RICHARD JENSEN
  • CLAYTON SADLER

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="en"> We estimate the age distribution's impact on carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2006 by exploiting demographic variation in a panel of 46 countries. To eliminate potential bias from endogeneity or omitted variables, we instrument for the age distribution in a country's current population with lagged birth rates, and the regressions control for total population, total output, and country and year fixed effects. Carbon dioxide emissions increase with the share of the population aged 35 to 49 years, and this result is statistically significant and quantitatively large. (JEL Q4, J1)

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Lugauer & Richard Jensen & Clayton Sadler, 2014. "An Estimate Of The Age Distribution'S Effect On Carbon Dioxide Emissions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(2), pages 914-929, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:52:y:2014:i:2:p:914-929
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.12054
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jeners:v:10:y:2017:i:5:p:660-:d:98027 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Steven Lugauer, 2012. "The Supply of Skills in the Labor Force and Aggregate Output Volatility," Working Papers 005, University of Notre Dame, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2012.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:815-:d:98714 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:1839-:d:150246 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:gam:jeners:v:11:y:2018:i:5:p:1157-:d:144796 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. KPEMOUA, Palakiyem, 2016. "Analyse Du Lien Entre Les Emissions De Co2, Leur Restriction Et La Croissance Economique Du Togo
      [Analysis Of The Nexus Between Co2 Emission, Their Restriction And Economic Growth Of Togo]
      ," MPRA Paper 77624, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Oct 2016.
    7. Fei Wang & Changjian Wang & Yongxian Su & Lixia Jin & Yang Wang & Xinlin Zhang, 2017. "Decomposition Analysis of Carbon Emission Factors from Energy Consumption in Guangdong Province from 1990 to 2014," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-15, February.
    8. Wen Guo & Tao Sun & Hongjun Dai, 2016. "Effect of Population Structure Change on Carbon Emission in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-20, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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