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The Effect of Newer Drugs on Health Spending: Do They Really Increase the Costs?

  • Civan, Abdülkadir
  • Koksal, Bulent

We analyze the influence of technological progress on pharmaceuticals on rising health expenditures using US State level panel data. Improvements in medical technology are believed to be partly responsible for rapidly rising health expenditures. Even if the technological progress in medicine improves health outcomes and life quality, it can also increase the expenditure on health care. Our findings suggest that newer drugs increase the spending on prescription drugs since they are usually more expensive than their predecessors. However, they lower the demand for other types of medical services, which causes the total spending to decline. A one-year decrease in the average age of prescribed drugs causes per capita health expenditures to decrease by $31.92. The biggest decline occurs in spending on hospital and home health care due to newer drugs.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6846/1/MPRA_paper_6846.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 6846.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6846
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  1. Duggan Mark G & Evans William N, 2008. "Estimating the Impact of Medical Innovation: A Case Study of HIV Antiretroviral Treatments," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 1-39, January.
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  7. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 2000. "International comparisons of health expenditure: Theory, data and econometric analysis," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 11-53 Elsevier.
  8. Serena Ng & Pierre Perron, 2001. "LAG Length Selection and the Construction of Unit Root Tests with Good Size and Power," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(6), pages 1519-1554, November.
  9. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Löthgren, Mickael, 1998. "On stationarity and cointegration of international health expenditure and GDP," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 232, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 29 Jan 1999.
  10. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
  11. Cutler, David M & McClellan, Mark & Newhouse, Joseph P, 1998. "What Has Increased Medical-Care Spending Bought?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 132-36, May.
  12. Duggan, Mark, 2005. "Do new prescription drugs pay for themselves?: The case of second-generation antipsychotics," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-31, January.
  13. Civan Abdulkadir & Maloney Michael T., 2006. "The Determinants of Pharmaceutical Research and Development Investments," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-38, September.
  14. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
  15. Karlsson, Sune & Löthgren, Mickael, 1999. "On the power and interpretation of panel unit root tests," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 299, Stockholm School of Economics.
  16. David M. Drukker, 2003. "Testing for serial correlation in linear panel-data models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(2), pages 168-177, June.
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