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How do economic incentives and regulatory factors influence adoption of cardiac technologies? Result from the TECH project

  • Bech, Mickael

    ()

    (Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark)

  • Christiansen, Terkel

    ()

    (Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark)

  • Dunham, Kelly

    ()

    (Center for Health Policy, Stanford University)

  • Lauridsen, Jørgen

    ()

    (Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark)

  • Lyttkens, Carl Hampus

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • McDonald, Kathryn

    ()

    (Center for Health Policy, Stanford University)

  • McGuire, Alistair

    ()

    (LSE Health & Social Care, London School of Economics)

  • TECH investigators, the

    (various)

The TECH research network collected patient-level data on three procedures for treatment of heart attack patients, (catheterization, coronary artery by-pass grafts and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty), for seventeen countries over an eighteen year period to examine the impact of economic and institutional factors on technology adoption. Specific institutional factors are shown to be important to the up-take of these technologies. Health care systems characterized as public contract systems and reimbursement systems have higher adoption rates than public integrated health care systems. Central funding of investments was negatively associated with adoption rates. GDP per capita also has a strong role in initial adoption. The impact of income and institutional characteristics on the utilization rates of these procedures diminishes over time.

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File URL: http://project.nek.lu.se/publications/workpap/Papers/WP06_15.pdf
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Paper provided by Lund University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2006:15.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: 14 Feb 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in Health Economics .
Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2006_015
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Box 7082, S-220 07 Lund,Sweden
Phone: +46 +46 222 0000
Fax: +46 +46 2224613
Web page: http://www.nek.lu.se/en
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  8. Cutler, David & Huckman, Robert, 2003. "Technological Development and Medical Productivity: The Diffusion of Angioplasty in New York State," Scholarly Articles 2664291, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Kornai, J, 1979. "Resource-Constrained versus Demand-Constrained Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 801-19, July.
  10. Escarce, JoseJ., 1996. "Externalities in hospitals and physician adoption of a new surgical technology: An exploratory analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 715-734, December.
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  14. Nystedt , Paul & Lyttkens , Carl Hampus, 2002. "Age diffusion never stops? Carotid endarterectomy among the elderly," Working Papers 2002:7, Lund University, Department of Economics.
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