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Prescription Drug Coverage and Elderly Medicare Spending

Author

Listed:
  • Baoping Shang
  • Dana P. Goldman

Abstract

The introduction of Medicare Part D has generated interest in the cost of providing drug coverage to the elderly. Of paramount importance -- often unaccounted for in budget estimates -- are the salutary effects that increased prescription drug use might have on other Medicare spending. This paper uses longitudinal data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) to estimate how prescription drug benefits affect Medicare spending. We compare spending and service use for Medigap enrollees with and without drug coverage. Because of concerns about selection, we use variation in supply-side regulations of the individual insurance market -- including guaranteed issue and community rating -- as instruments for prescription drug coverage. We employ a discrete factor model to control for individual-level heterogeneity that might induce bias in the effects of drug coverage. Medigap prescription drug coverage increases drug spending by $170 or 22%, and reduces Medicare Part A spending by $350 or 13% (in 2000 dollars). Medigap prescription drug coverage reduces Medicare Part B spending, but the estimates are not statistically significant. Overall, a $1 increase in prescription drug spending is associated with a $2.06 reduction in Medicare spending. Furthermore, the substitution effect decreases as income rises, and thus provides support for the low-income assistance program of Medicare Part D.

Suggested Citation

  • Baoping Shang & Dana P. Goldman, 2007. "Prescription Drug Coverage and Elderly Medicare Spending," NBER Working Papers 13358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13358
    Note: HC AG PE
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w13358.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Claude Montmarquette & Stéphanie Boulenger & Joanne Castonguay, 2014. "Les risques liés à la création de PHARMA-QUEBEC," CIRANO Project Reports 2014rp-05, CIRANO.
    2. Lambrelli D & O’Donnell O, 2009. "Why Does the Utilization of Pharmaceuticals Vary So Much Across Europe? Evidence from Micro Data on Older Europeans," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Sara Allin & Jeremiah Hurley, 2009. "Inequity in publicly funded physician care: what is the role of private prescription drug insurance?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(10), pages 1218-1232.
    4. William Encinosa & Didem Bernard & Avi Dor, 2010. "Does Prescription Drug Adherence Reduce Hospitalizations and Costs?," NBER Working Papers 15691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Partha Deb & Pravin K. Trivedi & David M. Zimmer, 2009. "Dynamic Cost-offsets of Prescription Drug Expenditures: Panel Data Analysis Using a Copula-based Hurdle Model," NBER Working Papers 15191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Munkin M & Trivedi P. K, 2009. "Incentives and Selection Effects of Drug Coverage on Total Drug Expenditure: a Finite Mixture Approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    7. Glazer Jacob & Huskamp Haiden A. & McGuire Thomas G., 2012. "A Prescription for Drug Formulary Evaluation: An Application of Price Indexes," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 1-26, March.
    8. Abdülkad&idot;r C&idot;van & Bülent Köksal, 2010. "The effect of newer drugs on health spending: do they really increase the costs?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 581-595.
    9. Florian Heiss & Daniel McFadden & Joachim Winter, 2008. "Mind the Gap! Consumer Perceptions and Choices," MEA discussion paper series 08156, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    10. Florian Heiss & Daniel McFadden & Joachim Winter, 2010. "Mind the Gap! Consumer Perceptions and Choices of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans," NBER Chapters,in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 413-481 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Glazer, Jacob & McGuire, Thomas G., 2012. "A welfare measure of “offset effects” in health insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(5), pages 520-523.
    12. Melissa Boyle, 2008. "Costs and Benefits of Elderly Prescription Drug Coverage: Evidence from Veterans’ Health Care," Working Papers 0803, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.

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    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General

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