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STEM Education and Economic Performance in the American States

Author

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  • Ray, Rita

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of STEM graduates on the level and growth of real GDP per-capita for the 50 US states and the District of Columbia between 1990 and 2011. This paper also examines the effect of STEM graduates on approved utility patents per one million people. The findings show that the share of STEM graduates has a statistically significant positive effect on the level and growth of real GDP per-capita. The results are robust irrespective of estimation methods. The paper finds that an increase in the share of STEM graduates increases the number of approved utility patents per one million people but that the statistical significance of the results depends on the estimation methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Ray, Rita, 2015. "STEM Education and Economic Performance in the American States," MPRA Paper 65511, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    STEM Education; Economic Performance;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • R19 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Other

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