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Unintended Consequences of Childcare Regulation in Chile: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design

Listed author(s):
  • Villena, Mauricio G.
  • Sanchez, Rafael
  • Rojas, Eugenio

In several countries governments fund childcare provision, but in many others it is privately funded as labour regulation mandates that firms have to provide childcare services. For this latter case, there is no empirical evidence on the effects generated by the financial burden of childcare provision. In particular, there is no evidence about who effectively pays (i.e. firms or employees) and how it pays (i.e. via wages and/or employment). This study is the first one to provide such evidence. Our hypothesis is that, in imperfect labour markets (e.g. oligopsonistic), firms will transfer childcare cost on to their workers. To analyze this, we exploit a discontinuity on childcare provision mandated by Chilean labour regulation. Our results suggest that firms transfer entirely the cost of childcare (nearly 100%) to their workers via lower wages (not only to female but also to male workers) and not through the alteration of the share of male workers within the firm. This is consistent with our finding that firms do not manipulate the threshold (number of female workers) because they avoid the burden by transfering the cost to their employees.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/62096/1/MPRA_paper_62096.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 62096.

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Date of creation: 21 Nov 2011
Date of revision: 10 Feb 2015
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:62096
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  1. Jens Ludwig & Douglas L. Miller, 2007. "Does Head Start Improve Children's Life Chances? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 159-208.
  2. Herbst, Chris M. & Tekin, Erdal, 2008. "Child Care Subsidies and Child Development," IZA Discussion Papers 3836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Guido Imbens & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Regression Discontinuity Designs: A Guide to Practice," NBER Working Papers 13039, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Samuel Berlinski & Sebastian Galiani, 2004. "The effect of a large expansion of pre-primary school facilities on preschool attendance and maternal employment," IFS Working Papers W04/30, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Gregory Veramendi & Sergio Urzúa, 2011. "The Impact of Out-of-Home Childcare Centers on Early Childhood Development," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 35658, Inter-American Development Bank.
  6. Lemieux, Thomas & Milligan, Kevin, 2006. "Incentive Effects of Social Assistance: A Regression Discontinuity Approach," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006280e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  7. Samuel Berlinski & Sebastian Galiani & Paul Gertler, 2006. "The effect of pre-primary education on primary school performance," IFS Working Papers W06/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Berlinski, Samuel & Galiani, Sebastian & Manacorda, Marco, 2007. "Giving children a better start : preschool attendance and school-age profiles," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4240, The World Bank.
  9. Blau, David M. & Tekin, Erdal, 2001. "The Determinants and Consequences of Child Care Subsidies for Single Mothers," IZA Discussion Papers 383, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Jonah B. Gelbach, 2002. "Public Schooling for Young Children and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 307-322, March.
  11. David S. Lee & Thomas Lemieux, 2010. "Regression Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(2), pages 281-355, June.
  12. McCrary, Justin, 2008. "Manipulation of the running variable in the regression discontinuity design: A density test," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 698-714, February.
  13. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2006. "Universal Childcare, Maternal Labor Supply, and Family Well-Being," Working Papers id:547, eSocialSciences.
  14. Elizabeth Cascio, 2006. "Public Preschool and Maternal Labor Supply: Evidence from the Introduction of Kindergartens into American Public Schools," NBER Working Papers 12179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Lee, David S., 2008. "Randomized experiments from non-random selection in U.S. House elections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 675-697, February.
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