IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Conventional or New? Optimal Investment Allocation across Vintages of Technology

  • Aruga, Osamu

This paper develops and analyzes a growth model that consists of complementary long-lived and short-lived vintage-specific capital. As a result of the existence of complementary capital that is vintage compatible but has different longevity, the model generates two distinct investment patterns: (i) if the rate of vintage-specific technological progress is above a threshold–which is the product of long-lived capital’s share and the difference in the rates of depreciation–then all new investment is allocated to the capital that embodies the frontier technology; (ii) otherwise, some investment is allocated to obsolete, short-lived capital to exploit the existing stock of obsolete long-lived capital. The result provides a new explanation for observed investment in obsolete technologies. An important implication of this result is that equipment price-changes do not necessarily reflect the rate of progress, since the prices of obsolete short-lived capital remain the same when the rate of the progress is slow enough (as mentioned in (ii) above). Another implication is that acceleration in the rate of vintage-specific technological progress can cause an abrupt reallocation of investment towards modern capital–consistent with investment booms that are concentrated in certain “high-tech” equipment.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6043/1/MPRA_paper_6043.pdf
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18129/4/MPRA_paper_18129.pdf
File Function: revised version
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18634/1/MPRA_paper_18634.pdf
File Function: revised version
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/21884/2/MPRA_paper_21884.pdf
File Function: revised version
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/28877/1/MPRA_paper_28877.pdf
File Function: revised version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 6043.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 23 Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6043
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Leonardo Felli & Francois Ortalo-Magne, . "Technological Innovations: Slumps and Booms," Penn CARESS Working Papers c468f14544cc51cba56e9b940, Penn Economics Department.
  2. Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2005. "Modeling and Measuring Organization Capital," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 1026-1053, October.
  3. Prucha, Ingmar R. & Nadiri, M. Ishaq, 1996. "Endogenous capital utilization and productivity measurement in dynamic factor demand models Theory and an application to the U.S. electrical machinery industry," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 343-379.
  4. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-62, June.
  5. Ellen R. McGrattan & James A. Schmitz, Jr., 1999. "Maintenance and repair: too big to ignore," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Fall, pages 2-13.
  6. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2002. "Information technology and productivity: where are we now and where are we going?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q3, pages 15-44.
  7. Charles R. Hulten, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change is Embodied in Capital," NBER Working Papers 3971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Mullen, J. K. & Williams, Martin, 2004. "Maintenance and repair expenditures: determinants and tradeoffs with new capital goods," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 483-499.
  9. Jovanovic, Boyan & Nyarko, Yaw, 1996. "Learning by Doing and the Choice of Technology," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(6), pages 1299-1310, November.
  10. John Laitner & Dmitriy Stolyarov, 2003. "Technological Change and the Stock Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1240-1267, September.
  11. Hulten, Charles R, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change Is Embodied in Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 964-80, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6043. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.