IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/52300.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Is the U.S. Private Education Sector Infected by Baumol’s Cost Disease? Evidence from the 50 States

Author

Listed:
  • Bates, Laurie
  • Santerre, Rexford

Abstract

High and rising costs characterize the private education industry in the United States. This paper tests if Baumol’s cost disease of the service sector can explain some of the growth of private education spending. An empirical strategy developed by Hartwig (2008) and Colombier (2010) and a panel data set of all U.S. states over the period from 1980 to 2009 are used in the empirical analysis. The empirical results indicate that Baumol’s cost disease does infect the private education industry in the United States. The results are reasonably robust with respect to state- and time-fixed effects, two-stage least squares estimation, individual state time trends, and a variety of potentially important covariates.

Suggested Citation

  • Bates, Laurie & Santerre, Rexford, 2013. "Is the U.S. Private Education Sector Infected by Baumol’s Cost Disease? Evidence from the 50 States," MPRA Paper 52300, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52300
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/52300/1/MPRA_paper_52300.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jack E. Triplett & Barry P. Bosworth, 2003. "Productivity measurement issues in services industries: "Baumol's disease" has been cured," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 23-33.
    2. Hartwig, Jochen, 2008. "What drives health care expenditure?--Baumol's model of 'unbalanced growth' revisited," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 603-623, May.
    3. Davis, Morris A. & Heathcote, Jonathan, 2007. "The price and quantity of residential land in the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 2595-2620, November.
    4. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    6. Jochen Hartwig, 2011. "Can Baumol's model of unbalanced growth contribute to explaining the secular rise in health care expenditure? An alternative test," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 173-184.
    7. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Private education spending; Baumol's cost disease; aggregate productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52300. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.