IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/39982.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The transition to market-based economic education: evaluating program effectiveness in Kazakhstan

Author

Listed:
  • Grimes, Paul W.
  • Millea, Meghan J.
  • Campbell, Randall C.

Abstract

This article presents an analysis of a program designed to enhance economic literacy through teacher training in the former Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan. The cognitive and affective outcomes for high school students who were taught by teachers trained through the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) International Economic Education Exchange Program (IEEEP) are examined and compared to those of students in courses taught by a sample of teachers who had not received training. like most publicly supported programs, beneficiaries were not randomly chosen and assigned to treatment and control groups. To overcome the inherent sample selection which allowed for the interdependency of economic understanding and attitudes. The results indicate that students taught by trained teachers achieved higher post course scores on standardized testing instruments, after controlling for differences in student attributes, teacher characteristics, and the non-random selection of teachers into the training program. However, both the cognitive and affective improvements would have been greater even if teachers had been randomly assigned to the program. The authors call for additional research to evaluate the criteria and methods used to recruit and select teachers for participation in training programs such as the IEEEP.

Suggested Citation

  • Grimes, Paul W. & Millea, Meghan J. & Campbell, Randall C., 2009. "The transition to market-based economic education: evaluating program effectiveness in Kazakhstan," MPRA Paper 39982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39982
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39982/1/MPRA_paper_39982.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul W. Grimes, 1995. "Economic Education for At-Risk Students: An Evaluation of Choices & Changes," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 39(1), pages 71-83, March.
    2. Shiller, Robert J & Boycko, Maxim & Korobov, Vladimir, 1991. "Popular Attitudes toward Free Markets: The Soviet Union and the United States Compared," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 385-400, June.
    3. Robert C Stuart, 2000. "Introduction: Teaching Modern Economics in Transition Economies," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 42(2), pages 1-3, July.
    4. Ransom, Michael R, 1987. "The Labor Supply of Married Men: A Switching Regressions Model," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 63-75, January.
    5. Murphy, Kevin M & Topel, Robert H, 2002. "Estimation and Inference in Two-Step Econometric Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 88-97, January.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Alston, Richard M & Kearl, J R & Vaughan, Michael B, 1992. "Is There a Consensus among Economists in the 1990's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 203-209, May.
    8. Becker, William E & Greene, William & Rosen, Sherwin, 1990. "Research on High School Economic Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 14-22, May.
    9. William B. Walstad & Ken Rebeck, 2001. "Teacher and Student Economic Understanding in Transition Economies," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 58-67, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic education; transitional economy; Kazakhstan; evaluation; teachers; students; learning; cognition; attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • A29 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Other
    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics
    • A21 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Pre-college

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39982. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.