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The Labor Supply of Married Men: A Switching Regressions Model

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  • Michael R. Ransom

    (University of Arizona)

Abstract

According to the family utility function approach, the labor supply functions of married men should differ according to whether or not their wives also work. In this paper I explicitly model the switching nature of labor supply while also accounting for the endogeneity of the labor force participation decision of the wife, using an endogenous switching regressions model based on the quadratic family utility function. The model is estimated from a cross-section of 1210 married couples from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael R. Ransom, 1985. "The Labor Supply of Married Men: A Switching Regressions Model," Working Papers 571, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:191
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    Cited by:

    1. Guy Lacroix & Nadia Joubert & Bernard Fortin, 2004. "Offre de travail au noir en présence de la fiscalité et des contrôles fiscaux," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 164(3), pages 145-163.
    2. Daniel J. Phaneuf & Catherine L. Kling & Joseph A. Herriges, 2000. "Estimation and Welfare Calculations in a Generalized Corner Solution Model with an Application to Recreation Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 83-92, February.
    3. Phaneuf, Daniel James, 1997. "Generalized corner solution models in recreation demand," ISU General Staff Papers 1997010108000013022, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Sarah Brown & Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2010. "Reservation wages, labour market participation and health," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(3), pages 501-529.
    5. Garcia, Inmaculada & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2001. "Labour Supply and Inequality for Wage-Earning Farm Households in Spain," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(1), pages 1-24, January.
    6. Robin L. Bartlett & James H. Grant & Timothy I. Miller, 1990. "Personality Differences and Executive Compensation," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 187-195, Jul-Sep.
    7. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:103-204 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Inmaculada Garcia & Carmen Marcuello, 2002. "Family model of contributions to non-profit organizations and labour supply," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 259-265.
    9. Flavio Marques & Simone Covre & Enlinson Mattos, 2008. "Oferta de trabalho e transferências: Evidências do efeito das condições impostas pelo programa Bolsa-Família," Anais do XXXVI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 36th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 200807141223420, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    10. Inmaculada Garcia & Jose Alberto Molina, 1998. "Household labour supply with rationing in Spain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(12), pages 1557-1570.
    11. Grimes, Paul W. & Millea, Meghan J. & Campbell, Randall C., 2009. "The transition to market-based economic education: evaluating program effectiveness in Kazakhstan," MPRA Paper 39982, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor supply; switching regression;

    JEL classification:

    • C99 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Other

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