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Building livelihood resilience: a case study of factors affecting farm households’ adoption of coping and adaptive strategies in rural Nigeria


  • Oparinde, Adewale
  • Hodge, Ian


Recent research on social and ecological resilience has recognised the importance of identifying opportunities in adversities, providing a wealth of theoretical knowledge; but empirical evidence remains a major gap not only for sustainability debates but also for focusing development objectives. The aim of this paper is to identify aspect of rural livelihoods that assists in sustaining households’ coping and adaptive capacities during a crisis, thus attempting to diagnose which element of a livelihood has potential for maximising livelihood resilience and minimising vulnerabilities. This paper takes an example of how a society reorganises under a process of novel change by examining households’ coping and risk management strategies in response to shock and stress created by avian influenza (H5N1) outbreaks in rural Nigeria. Using a multivariate probit model accounting for complementarities and substitution effects, the paper shows the significance of social capital, market access, communal insurance and ex ante biosecurity investment in influencing responses and in strengthening coping capacities; and argues that these elements may also have potential for maintaining livelihood resilience in the rural area.

Suggested Citation

  • Oparinde, Adewale & Hodge, Ian, 2011. "Building livelihood resilience: a case study of factors affecting farm households’ adoption of coping and adaptive strategies in rural Nigeria," MPRA Paper 39162, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39162

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gillespie, Jeffrey M. & Davis, Christopher G. & Rahelizatovo, Noro C., 2004. "Factors Influencing the Adoption of Breeding Technologies in U.S. Hog Production," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(01), pages 35-47, April.
    2. Frank Ellis, 2000. "The Determinants of Rural Livelihood Diversification in Developing Countries," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 289-302.
    3. Birol, Ekin & Asare-Marfo, Dorene & Ayele, Gezahegn & Mensa-Bonsu, Akwasi & Ndirangu, Lydia & Okpukpara, Benjamin & Roy, Devesh & Yakhshilikov, Yorbol, 2010. "Investigating the role of poultry in livelihoods and the impact of avian flu on livelihoods outcomes in Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 1011, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Birol, Ekin & Asare-Marfo, Dorene & Ayele, Gezahegn & Mensah-Bonsu, Akwasi & Ndirangu, Lydia K. & Okpukpara, Benjamin & Roy, Devesh & Yakhshilikov, Yorbol, 2010. "Investigating the Role of Poultry in Livelihoods and the Impact of HPAI on Livelihoods Outcomes in Africa: Evidence from Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 97084, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    5. Liangzhi You & Xinshen Diao, 2007. "Assessing the Potential Impact of Avian Influenza on Poultry in West Africa: A Spatial Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 348-367, June.
    6. Young, Gary & Valdez, Emiliano A. & Kohn, Robert, 2009. "Multivariate probit models for conditional claim-types," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 214-228, April.
    7. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966.
    8. Udry, Christopher, 1995. "Risk and Saving in Northern Nigeria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1287-1300, December.
    9. Udry, Christopher, 1990. "Credit Markets in Northern Nigeria: Credit as Insurance in a Rural Economy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 4(3), pages 251-269, September.
    10. Takasaki, Yoshito & Barham, Bradford L. & Coomes, Oliver T., 2004. "Risk coping strategies in tropical forests: floods, illnesses, and resource extraction," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(02), pages 203-224, May.
    11. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2003. "Multivariate probit regression using simulated maximum likelihood," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(3), pages 278-294, September.
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    More about this item


    Multivariate probit; asset; coping; livelihoods; resilience; vulnerability;

    JEL classification:

    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy


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