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Maroc éducation et emploi une analyse théorique
[Morocco education and employment a theory]


  • Jellal, Mohamed


In this paper, we consider a theoritical model helping to provide a new insights into the functioning of moroccan labor market. The model examines the impact of imperfect competition among firms with access to specific technologies on the emergence of the new modern economy.The The emergence of this economy is characterized by the size of the employment of workers accepting wage for the specific training needed as well as the firms incentive to invest in new technologies given the competitive structure of the labor market and the product produced and exported under uncertain demand. Indeed it is assumed that each of these firms try to attract workers who are the best match for them ie the best trained and who bear the full cost of training is required for the job offered. Both the long term equilibrium wage offered and population distribution are determined. The structure of this new economy depends on both individual incentives as well as those established by public authorities.

Suggested Citation

  • Jellal, Mohamed, 2012. "Maroc éducation et emploi une analyse théorique
    [Morocco education and employment a theory]
    ," MPRA Paper 38465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:38465

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jellal, Mohamed & Thisse, Jacques-Francois & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Demand uncertainty, mismatch and (un)employment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 33-39, July.
    2. Susanto Basu & David N. Weil, 1998. "Appropriate Technology and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1025-1054.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1999. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 112-142, February.
    4. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
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    More about this item


    Formal sector; Education ; Job matching; wages competition;

    JEL classification:

    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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