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Impacts of globalization on quality of life: evidence from developing countries

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  • Sapkota, Jeet Bahadur

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impacts of globalization on quality of life, particularly on human development, gender development and human poverty in developing countries. Applying the fixed effect model to the annual panel data of 124 developing countries covering nine years from 1997, it shows that globalization (in terms of its comprehensive indexes and key elements) not only promotes human and gender development, but also significantly reduces human poverty. Not surprisingly, all the three aspects of globalization (economic, social and political) contribute to the overall effect of globalization. In general, the results from the key elements of globalization are consistent with the results from the comprehensive indexes. However, it is also observed that political and social globalization, FDI, and international migration were insignificant to gender-related development. Thus, further research is suggested for appropriate policy recommendations to make these variables significant on promoting gender aspects of development.

Suggested Citation

  • Sapkota, Jeet Bahadur, 2011. "Impacts of globalization on quality of life: evidence from developing countries," MPRA Paper 37506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37506
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/37506/1/MPRA_paper_37506.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sapkota, Jeet Bahadur, 2014. "Access to Infrastructure and Human Development:Cross-Country Evidence," Working Papers 70, JICA Research Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; human development; gender development; human poverty; developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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