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Demography and evolution of regional inequality

  • Tatiane Menezes


  • R. Silveira-Neto


  • Carlos Azzoni


This paper addresses the importance of life cycle aspects in explaining the evolution of regional income inequality. The analysis of household microdata organized in age cohorts shows that Brazilian regional income inequality has different dynamics across generations, with income convergence being observed only for the older generations. The larger income share of younger generations produces a low speed of convergence in the country. When retirement payments, pensions, and other government transfers are excluded from income, convergence is not observed even for the older generations. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Annals of Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 643-655

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Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:49:y:2012:i:3:p:643-655
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  1. Phan, Diep & Coxhead, Ian, 2010. "Inter-provincial migration and inequality during Vietnam's transition," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 100-112, January.
  2. Finis Welch, 1979. "Effects of Cohort Size on Earnings: The Baby Boom Babies' Financial Bust," UCLA Economics Working Papers 146, UCLA Department of Economics.
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  8. Chiswick, Barry R., 2000. "Are Immigrants Favorably Self-Selected? An Economic Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 131, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Katz, L.F. & Murphy, K.M., 1991. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1580, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  13. Stein �stbye & Olle Westerlund, 2007. "Is Migration Important for Regional Convergence? Comparative Evidence for Norwegian and Swedish Counties, 1980-2000," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 901-915.
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  16. Welch, Finis, 1979. "Effects of Cohort Size on Earnings: The Baby Boom Babies' Financial Bust," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S65-97, October.
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