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Spillovers in learning and behavior: Evidence from a nutritional information campaign in urban slums

  • Singh, Prakarsh

This paper provides evidence for spillovers in learning and behavior within urban slums in Chandigarh, India. In an experiment, mothers of children (aged 3-6 years) enrolled in government day-care centers were provided recipe books to lower their price per calorie. Theory suggests that if learning takes place among untreated mothers in the same slum cluster, it may increase or decrease their food expenditure. Results from a difference-in-differences analysis show that nutritional knowledge increases among untreated mothers and there is a corresponding reduction in food expenditure. These neighbouring mothers exhibit learning spillovers and a reduction in expenditure regardless of their level of literacy.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/33362/1/MPRA_paper_33362.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 33362.

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Date of creation: May 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33362
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  17. Singh, Prakarsh, 2011. "Performance Pay and Information: Reducing Child Malnutrition in Urban Slums," MPRA Paper 29403, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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