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Signaling the Strength of a Market Entrant


  • Janda, Karel


This article belongs to the game theoretic and information economics literature dealing with the problem of signaling in the context of game theoretical models of entry into the industry. As opposed to the majority of literature we consider the situation of asymmetric information where the private information belongs to the entrant. We model the capacity decision of the entrant as a signal of his strength. We show that in the Stackelberg model of market entry for some values of underlying parameters the entrant fully utilizes his capacity while for other parameter values he builds excess capacity. The model may be empirically relevant for industrial organization analysis of the entry of a new supplier to the existing supply chain.

Suggested Citation

  • Janda, Karel, 2009. "Signaling the Strength of a Market Entrant," MPRA Paper 17007, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17007

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1982. "Limit Pricing and Entry under Incomplete Information: An Equilibrium Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(2), pages 443-459, March.
    2. Riccardo Faini & Jaime Melo & Wendy Takacs, 1995. "A Primer on the MFA Maze," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 113-135, January.
    3. Michele M. Veeman, 1997. "Marketing Boards: The Canadian Experience Revisited," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 45(4), pages 411-420, December.
    4. Michele M. Veeman, 1997. "Marketing Boards: The Canadian Experience Revisited," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1554-1562.
    5. Dan Kovenock & Raymond Deneckere & Tom Faith & Beth Allen, 2000. "Capacity precommitment as a barrier to entry: A Bertrand-Edgeworth approach," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 15(3), pages 501-530.
    6. repec:fth:geneec:93.07 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kala Krishna & Ling Hui Tan, 1992. "License Price Paths: I. Theory II. Evidence from Hong Kong," NBER Working Papers 4237, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kresimir Zigic, 2005. "Theory of Strategic Trade Policy in North–South Trade: Optimal Northern and Southern Tariffs in an Inherently Asymmetric Environment," CERGE-EI Books, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague, edition 1, number b04, March.
    9. Krishna, Kala & Tan, Ling Hui, 1999. "Transferable Licenses versus Nontransferable Licenses: What Is the Difference?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 785-800, August.
    10. Cave, Jonathan & Salant, Stephen W, 1995. "Cartel Quotas under Majority Rule," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 82-102, March.
    11. Steve McCorriston, 1996. "Import Quota Licenses and Market Power," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 367-372.
    12. Saloner, Garth, 1985. "Excess capacity as a policing device," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 83-86.
    13. Philip L. Paarlberg & John G. Lee, 2001. "U.S. Trade Policy on Lamb Meat: Who Gets Fleeced?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 196-208.
    14. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
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    More about this item


    Signaling; Entry; Capacity;

    JEL classification:

    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection

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