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Pakistan Panel Household Survey Sample Size, Attrition and Socio-demographic Dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Durr-e-Nayab

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad)

  • G. M. Arif

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Durr-e-Nayab & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Pakistan Panel Household Survey Sample Size, Attrition and Socio-demographic Dynamics," Poverty and Social Dynamics Paper Series 2012:01, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:psdpsr:2012:01
    as

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    File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/PSDPS/PSDPS%20Paper-1.pdf
    File Function: First Version, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. MOHAMMAD AfZAL & TAUHEED AHMED, 1974. "Limitations of Vital Registration System in Pakistan against Sample Population Estimation Project.A Case Study of Rawalpindi," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 13(3), pages 325-334.
    2. G. M. Arif & Faiz Bilquees, 2006. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in the PSES Panel Data," MIMAP Technical Paper Series 2006:20, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    3. Alderman, Harold & Behrman, Jere R. & Kohler, Hans-Peter & Maluccio, John A. & Cotts Watkins, Susan, 2000. "Attrition in longitudinal household survey data - some tests for three developing-country samples," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2447, The World Bank.
    4. Becketti, Sean & Gould, William & Lillard, Lee & Welch, Finis, 1988. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics after Fourteen Years: An Evaluatio n," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 472-492, October.
    5. Alison Aughinbaugh, 2004. "The Impact of Attrition on the Children of the NLSY79," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Sajid Amin Javed & Mohammad Irfan, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from Pakistan Panel Household Survey," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 175-203.
    2. Joyce J. Chen & Katrina Kosec & Valerie Mueller, 2019. "Temporary and permanent migrant selection: Theory and evidence of ability‐search cost dynamics," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(4), pages 1477-1519, November.
    3. Shujaat Farooq & Usman Ahmad, 2020. "Economic Growth and Rural Poverty in Pakistan: A Panel Dataset Analysis," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(4), pages 1128-1150, September.
    4. G. M. Arif & Durr-e-Nayab & Shujaat Farooq & Saman Nazir & Maryam Naeem Satti, 2012. "Welfare Impact of the Health Intervention in Pakistan: The Case of Lady Health Workers Programme," Poverty and Social Dynamics Paper Series 2012:07, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    5. G. M. Arif & Shujaat Farooq & Saman Nazir & Maryam Satti, 2014. "Child Malnutrition and Poverty: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 99-118.
    6. G. M. Arif & Shujaat Farooq, 2014. "Rural Poverty Dynamics in Pakistan: Evidence from Three Waves of the Panel Survey," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 71-98.
    7. Joyce J Chen & Katrina Kosec & Valerie Mueller, 2016. "Temporary and Permanent Migrant Selection: Theory and Evidence of Ability–Search Cost Dynamics," Working Papers id:8257, eSocialSciences.
    8. Hamid Hasan, 2016. "Does Happiness Adapt to Increase in Income? Evidence from Pakistan Socio-economic Survey (1998-2001)," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 55(2), pages 113-122.

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