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Measuring the Dynamics of Global Business Cycle Connectedness

Author

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  • Francis X. Diebold

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

  • Kamil Yilmaz

    () (Department of Economics, Koc University)

Abstract

Using a connectedness-measurement technology fundamentally grounded in modern network theory, we measure real output connectedness for a set of six developed countries, 1962-2010. We show that global connectedness is sizable and time-varying over the business cycle, and we study the nature of the time variation relative to the ongoing discussion about the changing nature of the global business cycle. We also show that connectedness corresponding to transmissions to others from the United States and Japan is disproportionately important.

Suggested Citation

  • Francis X. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2013. "Measuring the Dynamics of Global Business Cycle Connectedness," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-070, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  • Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:13-070
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    File URL: http://economics.sas.upenn.edu/system/files/13-070.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brian M. Doyle & Jon Faust, 2005. "Breaks in the Variability and Comovement of G-7 Economic Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 721-740, November.
    2. FrancisX. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2009. "Measuring Financial Asset Return and Volatility Spillovers, with Application to Global Equity Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 158-171, January.
    3. Diebold, Francis X. & Yılmaz, Kamil, 2014. "On the network topology of variance decompositions: Measuring the connectedness of financial firms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 182(1), pages 119-134.
    4. S. Borağan Aruoba & Francis X. Diebold & M. Ayhan Kose & Marco E. Terrones, 2011. "Globalization, the Business Cycle, and Macroeconomic Monitoring," NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 245-286.
    5. Margaret M. McConnell & Gabriel Perez-Quiros, 2000. "Output fluctuations in the United States: what has changed since the early 1980s?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    6. Dufour, Jean-Marie & Taamouti, Abderrahim, 2010. "Short and long run causality measures: Theory and inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 154(1), pages 42-58, January.
    7. Koop, Gary & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Potter, Simon M., 1996. "Impulse response analysis in nonlinear multivariate models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 119-147, September.
    8. Diebold, Francis X. & Yilmaz, Kamil, 2012. "Better to give than to receive: Predictive directional measurement of volatility spillovers," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 57-66.
    9. Pesaran, H. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 1998. "Generalized impulse response analysis in linear multivariate models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-29, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:finana:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:104-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jozef Barunik & Tomas Krehlik, 2015. "Measuring the frequency dynamics of financial connectedness and systemic risk," Papers 1507.01729, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2017.
    3. Salzmann, Leonard, 2016. "The G7 business cycle in a globalized world," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145633, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Marfatia, Hardik A. & Gupta, Rangan & Cakan, Esin, 2017. "The international REIT’s time-varying response to the U.S. monetary policy and macroeconomic surprises," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 640-653.
    5. Barunik, Jozef & Krehlik, Tomas, 2016. "Measuring the frequency dynamics of financial and macroeconomic connectedness," FinMaP-Working Papers 54, Collaborative EU Project FinMaP - Financial Distortions and Macroeconomic Performance: Expectations, Constraints and Interaction of Agents.
    6. Sanderson Abel & Pierre Le Roux, 2016. "Determinants of Banking Sector Profitability in Zimbabwe," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 845-854.
    7. Pu Chen & Willi Semmler, 2017. "Financial Stress, Regime Switching and Spillover Effects: Evidence from a Multi-Regime Global VAR Model," Working Papers 1708, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    8. Monica Billio & Roberto Casarin & Luca Rossini, 2016. "Bayesian Nonparametric Sparse Seemingly Unrelated Regression Model (SUR)," Papers 1608.02740, arXiv.org, revised Jul 2017.
    9. Erdenebat Bataa & Denise R.Osborn & Marianne Sensier, 2016. "China's Increasing Global Influence: Changes in International Growth Spillovers," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 221, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    10. John Cotter & Mark Hallam & Kamil Yilmaz, 2017. "Mixed-Frequency Macro-Financial Spillovers," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1704, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    11. Stan Hurn & Peter C B Phillips & Shuping Shi, 2015. "Change Detection and the Casual Impact of the Yield Curve," NCER Working Paper Series 107, National Centre for Econometric Research.
    12. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:208-218 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Jonathan E. Ogbuabor & Anthony Orji & Gladys C. Aneke & Oyun Erdene-Urnukh, 2016. "Measuring the Real and Financial Connectedness of Selected African Economies with the Global Economy," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(3), pages 364-399, September.
    14. Montinari, Letizia & Stracca, Livio, 2016. "Trade, finance or policies: What drives the cross-border spill-over of business cycles?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 131-148.
    15. Carstensen, K. & Salzmann, L., 2017. "The G7 business cycle in a globalized world," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(PA), pages 134-161.
    16. Křehlík, Tomáš & Baruník, Jozef, 2017. "Cyclical properties of supply-side and demand-side shocks in oil-based commodity markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 208-218.
    17. James Graham, 2014. "'N Sync: how do countries' economies move together?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Synchronization; coupling; de-coupling; network; G-7; real activity; industrial production; globalization;

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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