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Household Incidence of Pollution Control Policies: A Robust Welfare Analysis Using General Equilibrium Effects

  • Abdelkrim Araar

    ()

    (Département d’économique and CIRPEE, Université Laval)

  • Yazid Dissou

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa)

  • Jean-Yves Duclos

    ()

    (Département d’économique and CIRPEE, Université Laval)

This study assesses the incidence of pollution control policies on households. In contrast to previous studies, we employ an integrated framework combining a multisector general equilibrium model with a stochastic dominance analysis using household-level data. We consider three policy instruments in a domestic emission trading system: (i) an output-based allocation of permits (OBA); (ii) the use of the proceeds of permit sales to reduce payroll taxes (RPT); (iii) and the use of these proceeds to reduce consumption taxes instead(UCS). The general equilibrium results suggest that the return to capital is more negatively affected than the wage rate in all simulations, since polluting industries are capital intensive. Abstracting from pollution externalities, the dominance analysis allows us to conclude that all three policies have a normatively robust negative (positive) impact on welfare (poverty). Formal dominance tests indicate that RPT first-order welfare dominates OBA over all values of household incomes. UCS also first-order poverty dominates RPT for any choice of poverty line below $CAN 18,600, and for any poverty line at the second order. Finally, while the three pollution control policies do not have a numerically large impact on inequality (in comparison to the base run), statistical tests indicate that inequality increases statistically more with OBA and RPT than with UCS.

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File URL: http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/sites/default/files/public/eco/fra/documents/0805E.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Ottawa, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0805E.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ott:wpaper:0805e
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